[Marxism] America's Return to an Ideology of Warfare

Orion Anderson libraryofsocialscience at earthlink.net
Tue Nov 6 11:06:15 MST 2007


SEMINAR ON WAR, PART II: 
AMERICA'S RETURN TO AN IDEOLOGY OF WARFARE

Dear Colleague,

Why have psychologists failed to enter into the public domain in order to
interrogate the sources of political violence? My SEMINAR ON THE
PSYCHOLOGICAL INTERPRETATION OF WAR explores the motives that generate
collective forms of destruction and self-destruction.

In our first four sessions, we examined and discussed fundamental principles
of political psychology:

*	Identification with one's nation.
*	The desire to destroy enemies.
*	Warfare and the search for national unity.
*	Sacrifice and devotion to a sacred ideal.
*	Warfare and meaning ("something to kill and die for").

In the second half of our seminar, we turn to an analysis of the current
conflict in Iraq, exploring AMERICA'S RETURN TO AN IDEOLOGY OF WARFARE.

We invite you to join us, even if you have not participated in the first
four sessions.

The Seminar will occur at the following times. You may attend any or all of
these sessions:

Friday, NOVEMBER 9: 6:45 PM
Friday, NOVEMBER 16: 6:45 PM
Friday, NOVEMBER 30: 6:45 PM
Friday, DECEMBER 7: 6:45 PM
Friday, DECEMBER 14: 6:45 PM
Friday, DECEMBER 21: 6:45 PM

There is no charge to attend, but space is limited. To hold your place for
any or all of these dates, please send an email to:
oanderson at ideologiesofwar.com

Directions to get to Fordham University and instructions on gaining
admittance to the lecture appear below. We look forward to meeting you!

With best regards,
Richard Koenigsberg

 

PART II of Richard Koenigsberg's 
SEMINAR ON THE PSYCHOLOGICAL INTERPRETATION OF WAR: AMERICA'S RETURN TO AN
IDEOLOGY OF WARFARE

American culture in the ten years before September 11 was characterized by
an absence of interest in war. U. S. foreign policy was guided by an
"aversion to casualties." America hesitated to enter into violent political
conflict if there was a possibility that even a few soldiers might be
killed.

Foreign policy experts claim that the actions of America's enemies were
shaped by this policy of casualty aversion. Bin Laden wrote about how the
United States withdrawal from Mogadishu (in 1993) demonstrated clearly that
America was "weak and impotent." Perhaps the ferocity of American actions
after September 11 represented a response--not only to the fact that the
United States had been attacked--but to humiliating statements made by Bin
Laden and other Middle-Eastern radicals. The United States would demonstrate
in no uncertain terms that she was not weak and impotent.

 

The Seminar will occur at the following times:

Friday, NOVEMBER 9: 6:45 PM
Friday, NOVEMBER 16: 6:45 PM
Friday, NOVEMBER 30: 6:45 PM
Friday, DECEMBER 7: 6:45 PM
Friday, DECEMBER 14: 6:45 PM
Friday, DECEMBER 21: 6:45 PM

There is no charge to attend, but space is limited. To hold your place for
any or all of these dates, please send an email to:
oanderson at ideologiesofwar.com

 

Would Americans be willing to sacrifice the lives of young people in the
face of a ten-year policy of casualty aversion? Donald Rumsfeld asserted
that the world should not underestimate America's "capacity to suffer
casualties." Journalists insisted, "We're not in Mogadishu anymore."
President Bush declared that although some doubted the American character,
our troops had demonstrated their willingness to sacrifice for freedom and
democracy. Never again would the United States "cut and run."

After the fall of the Soviet Union, the American grand narrative of a
struggle between the free-world and communism dissipated. The struggle
against terrorism replaced the struggle against communism. Once again, the
United States would engage in a world-historic conflict to defeat an evil
enemy. As Middle-Eastern radicals were killing and dying for Allah, so
Americans would sacrifice their lives for freedom and democracy. The current
war constitutes a sacrificial competition: who is willing to die the
longest?

 

DETAILS FOR ATTENDING:

TRAVEL INFORMATION: To Reach Fordham University's Lincoln Center Campus by
Subway. The A, B, C, D, 1, and 9 subway trains all stop at 59th
Street/Columbus Circle. 60th Street is one block north of 59th Street. The
campus is located one block west on 60th Street at 113 W. 60th Street.

UPON YOUR ARRIVAL AT FORDHAM UNIVERSITY: At the entrance, simply say you are
attending the Seminar in Room 311. Take the escalator to the 1st floor, then
the elevator to the third floor. Turn left when you get off the elevator.
Room 311 is located near the end of the hallway on the left. 

For further information call Orion Anderson at 718-393-1104 or send an email
to oanderson at ideologiesofwar.com

 




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