On Line Sources for Marxian Texts

Juan Inigo jinigo at inscri.org.ar
Wed Feb 8 20:32:18 MST 1995


On Wed, 15 July 1994, Oliver Froehling (ORFROE00 at UKCC.UKY.EDU) posted the
following report to the list, and it seems useful to repeat it now:


>____________________________________________________________________________
>
>                   MARX AND ENGELS ONLINE LIBRARY GUIDE
>
>                            update: May 5, 1994
>                          (Happy birthday, Karl :)
>
>~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
>It has been a while since the Marx & Engels Online Library was updated
>-- even longer since it this annoucement has been issued about
>newsgroups and lists.  (And please distribute this freely.)
>
>But the library has grown.
>
>The M&E Online Library is constantly "under construction".  New works
>are added, errors are corrected (I thank those who report them) and
>further data on existent files are appended.  Net cruisers are
>encouraged to sweep in every two weeks or five to see what's new.
>However, monthly updates will be issued.
>
>There is absolutely no way to monetarily profit from this project.  It
>is a labor of love undertaken in the purest communitarian sense.  The
>real "profit" will hopefully manifest in the form of individual
>enlightenment through easy access to these classic works.
>
>The goal, however dreamy and distant at this juncture, is to have all
>major works online for the centennial of the passing of Frederick Engels
>-- August 5, 1995.
>
>
>~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>                               NEW MATERIAL
>~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
>The following works have been added to the M&E Archive since the
>January 30, 1994, update:
>
>1844 -- CRITICAL NOTES ON THE ARTICLE "THE KING OF PRUSSIA AND SOCIAL
>        REFORM. BY A PRUSSIAN."  Marx's aim here is two establish the
>        fact he didn't write the aforementioned article (Arnold Ruge
>        did).  Marx continues his theory that the state and private
>        life are separate and therefore the state cannot weed out
>        social misery alone -- as the writer of the original article
>        seemed to suggest.
>
>1847+ - THE COMMUNIST LEAGUE -- A new subdirectory, containing
>        documents from Marx and Engels work with the Communist League
>        and its predecessor.  Includes Engels' excellent history of
>        the League.
>
>1867 -- CAPITAL -- No, not complete.  Sorry.  But a start.
>
>
>~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>                              BACKGROUND
>~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
>The M&E library serves several functions.
>
>It provides research material and/or general reading pleasure for those
>interested in this epoch-shaping stream of thought.
>
>More importantly, these works are now constantly at hand and FREE (ok
>ok, I know you need a computer and a modem, etc., that's another story).
>The recent demise of Progress Publishers in Moscow means M&E texts will
>probably become harder to find, and most certainly more expensive --
>driving the volumes out of the range of students and working people.
>
>Once transcribed, and uploaded to the net, ascii-Marx/Engels works take
>on lives of their own, branching off from the mainstream net into little
>BBS eddies about the globe, from Austria to Australia.  I've happily
>heard from people who have found them in little local BBSs in places of
>which I've never heard.  As most local BBS users don't have access to
>the Internet, I assume a great many more are getting these files, yet
>have not the means to tell me so.
>
>There are several people scattered about the North American continent
>who have volunteered to help in ascii-transription of some Marx/Engels
>text.  Most are only _casually_ involved, so please do not think major
>time commitments are a requirement to help -- one chapter of one book
>goes a long way.  If you wish to aid in this project, please contact me
>at zodiac at io.org, to prevent duplication of effort.  The more the
>merrier.
>
>At any rate, I hope you find the Marx/Engels virtual library of value
>and enjoyment.
>
>But, enough of the background crap.  To the heart of things: the files
>themselves!
>
>
>~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>                            GETTING THE FILES
>~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
>There are three main ways to access the M&E archives:  Gopher, FTP,
>and Email.
>
>                                 GOPHER
>
>When logged into your Internet account, at the prompt type:
>
>     gopher csf.colorado.edu
>
>You will connect to a Boulder, Colorado, computer which will then present
>you an opening menu.  Select/type:
>
>     11
>
>which takes you into the Progressive Sociologist Network (PSN) menu; at
>this point, you will see the Marx and Engels section at number:
>
>      4
>
>Type that, and in you go.  Pick and choose among the dozens of texts
>available.
>
>The advantage of gopher is that it is makes it easier to use/browse the
>library, peek about into files; and, most importantly, gopher permits me
>to provide fuller file titles, so etext files can be named exactly as
>per the original works (as opposed to ftp listings, which have shorter
>names).
>
>If you decide you wish to keep a copy of a work, just hit (s)ave and it
>copies the file back to the home area of your account computer.
>
>You will find the full-titled gopher-file list of the complete M&E
>Online Library at the very end of this posting.
>
>                                   FTP
>
>If you don't want to browse, but rather just log in and snatch the
>whole library no-questions-asked, screw the rodent, login by ftp, and
>"mget -r" the lot.
>
>FTP ("File Transfer Protocol") is a method of zapping files around the
>planet, from one computer to another.  Assuming you have ftp capability,
>at the prompt, type
>
>     ftp csf.colorado.edu
>
>You will connected to the remote computer and will then be asked for a
>login name.  Type:
>
>     anonymous
>
>It will then ask you for a password: type
>
>     your at email.address
>
>Once in, type
>
>     cd psn/Marx
>
>and you will be in the directory.  Hit "ls" for a list of what files
>are there.  Type "get <filename>" to have a file sent back to your
>home directory.
>
>These are all exactly the same files you would see by gophering in --
>except their ftp names are invariably shorter and more cryptic
>looking.  For instance, the _Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts_ is
>titled EPManuscript.
>
>                                  EMAIL
>
>Not all Internet accounts have access to FTP or gopher.
>
>csf.colorado.edu also makes files available by mail.
>
>Fortunately, there are "ftp-by-mail" services offered by generous sites.
>Through ftp-by-mail, you place an "order" by email with a third
>computer, which then follows your instructions and logs into the
>computer holding the files you want (in this case csf.colorado.edu),
>grabs those files, then mails them to you.
>
>For details on how to work this, send an email message to either:
>
>     ftpmail at sunsite.unc.edu
>     ftpmail at pa.dec.com
>
>and put nothing but the word
>
>     help
>
>in the body of the message itself.  You will automatically be sent
>instructions on how to use this extremely helpful service.  Note that
>the first listed service above seems to have a faster turn-around time.
>
>TO GET A COPY OF THE ENTIRE DIRECTORY of the short UNIX names, send
>email to:
>
>     csfserv at csf.colorado.edu
>
>with only this in the body of the message (no signatures):
>
>     list psn/Marx
>
>You may have to do a wee bit of guess work to figure out what is what.
>Use the full-name gopher list attached below to help match up "decode"
>names.
>
>
>Piping Marx and Engels into cyberspace...
>
>Ken.
>Archivist, Marx/Engels Online Library
>
>
>~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>                 Gopher Listing of M/E Online Library
>~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
>This menu is set up recursively, meaning, subdirectories within
>directories are listed.  For instance, you can see that "1843 -- Letters
>to Arnold Ruge (M)" is really a directory, and inside it can be found
>three files -- namely, the three letters Marx wrote to his friend and
>co-editor Arnold Ruge.
>
>
>    1.  The M&E Online Library Update -- May 5, 1994 (read me!)
>    2.  1837+ - Young Marx (before editing Rheinische Zeitung)/
>          1836/11 --  Love Poems to Jenny (three).
>          1836/12 --  Feelings.
>          1836/12 --  My World.
>          1837/   --  Wild Songs.
>          1837/02 --  Transformation
>    3.  1842 -- Communism and the Augsburg Allgemeine Zeitung (M)
>    4.  1843 -- Letters to Arnold Ruge (M)/
>          Mar -- "Ship of Fools".
>          May -- On Prussian Absolutism.
>          Sep -- "Ruthless Criticism".
>    5.  1844 -- Critical Notes on "The King of Prussia" (M)
>    6.  1844 -- Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts (M)/
>    7.  1844 -- Intro to a Critique of Hegel's Philosophy of Right (M)
>    8.  1844 -- On The Jewish Question (M)
>    9.  1845 -- Theses on Feuerbach (M)
>    10. 1847 -- Communist League/
>          History of the Communist League (E - 1885)
>          1846 03/31 -- Weitling letter
>          1846 05/05 -- Marx asks Proudhon to join (M)
>          1850 03/   -- Address to the Communist League (ME)
>          1850 06/   -- Address to the Communist League (ME)
>    11. 1847 -- Principles of Communism (E)
>    12. 1847 -- The Poverty of Philosophy (M)/
>          A Scientific Discovery/
>               The Antithesis of Use Value and Exchange Value
>               Constituted Value and Synthetic Value
>               Application of the Law of the Proportionality of Value/
>                  -- Money
>                  -- Surplus Labor
>          The Metaphysics of Political Economy/
>               The Method
>               Division of Labor and Machinery
>               Competition and Monopoly
>               Property or Ground Rent
>               Strikes and Combinations of Workers
>    13. 1848 -- Communism, Revolution, and a Free Poland (M)
>    14. 1848 -- Speech: On The Question of Free Trade (M)/
>    15. 1848 -- The Communist Manifesto (ME)/
>          Collected Prefaces of Marx and Engels/
>          Bourgeois and Proletarians.
>          Proletarians and Communists.
>          Socialist and Communist Literature.
>          The Various Existing Opposition Parties.
>    16. 1849 -- Wage-Labor and Capital (M)/
>          Engels' 1891 Introduction.
>          Preliminary.
>          What Are Wages?.
>          By What is the Price of a Commodity Determined?.
>          By What Are Wages Determined?.
>          The Nature and Growth of Capital.
>          Relation of Wage-Labor to Capital.
>          The Rise and Fall of Wages and Profits.
>          Capital and Labor Are Diametrically Opposed.
>          Effect of Capitalist Competition on Classes.
>    17. 1850 -- England's 17th c. Revolution (ME)
>    18. 1853 -- The Duchess of Sutherland and Slavery (M)
>    19. 1857 -- Intro to a Critique of Political Economy (M)/
>          Production.
>          Relations of Production to Distribution....
>          The Method of Political Economy.
>          Various Topics.
>    20. 1858 -- Pre-Capitalist Economic Formations (M)/
>          introduction
>          part 1
>          part 2
>    21. 1858 -- The Grundrisse (M)/
>    22. 1864 -- International Working Men's Association/
>          1864 10/27 --  General Rules and Administrative Regulations .
>          1864 10/27 --  The Inaugural Address of the International.
>          1865 01/28 --  Address: Re-elected President Lincoln.
>          1865 02/13 --  Letter to J. B. Schweitzer.
>          1867 11/20 --  On the Fenian Prisoners in Manchester.
>          1868 05/11 --  Address: National Labor Union (US) on UK war.
>          1869 07/20 --  Resolution: Right of Inheritance.
>          1870 07/14 --  Programme for the 5th Congress.
>          1870 07/23 --  First Address on the Franco-Prussian War.
>          1870 09/09 --  Second Address on the Franco-Prussian War.
>          1871 05/30 --  Third Address on the Franco-Prussian War (Commune).
>          1871 09/20 --  Speech: Political Action and the Working Class.
>          1872 03/05 --  Fictitious Splits in the International (ME)/
>          1872 03/05 --  Resolution(s): US Federation Split.
>          1872 05/   --  Notes on the "American Split".
>          1872 09/   --  Resolution: Working Class Parties.
>          1872 09/08 --  Speech: The Political Battleground.
>          The Conflict with Bakunin (1868-72)
>               1868 12/15 -- Marx's Marginal Notes on Alliance Programme
>               1868 12/22 -- General Council Statement on Alliance
>               1869 03/09 -- General Council Letter to Alliance
>               1870 03/28 -- Confidential Circular on Alliance (M)
>               1871 09/18 -- Notes on Marx Speech (E)
>    23. 1867 -- Capital/
>          Marx's dedication
>          Collected prefaces and afterwords/
>          Part 1 -- Commodities and Money/
>          Part 2 -- Transformation of Money into Capital/
>          Part 3 -- Production of Absolute Surplus-Value/
>          Part 4 -- Production of Relative Surplus-Value/
>          Part 5 -- Production of Abs. and Rel. Surplus-Value/
>          Part 6 -- Wages/
>          Part 7 -- Accumulation of Capital/
>          Part 8 -- So-Called Primitive Accumulation/
>    24. 1867 -- Speech: Poland and the Russian Menace (M)
>    25. 1868 -- Synopsis of Marx's Capital (E)/
>          Introduction.
>          Commodities and Money.
>          The Transformation of Money into Capital.
>          The Production of Absolute Surplus-Value.
>          Relative.Surplus.
>    26. 1869 -- The Abolition of Landed Property (M)
>    27. 1871 -- Marx's Daughters in Post-Commune France (Jenny Marx)
>    28. 1871 -- New York World Interview with Marx
>    29. 1871 -- The Civil War in France (M)/
>          Chronology.
>          Engels' 1891 Introduction.
>          First Address -- July 23, 1870.
>          Second Address -- September 9, 1870.
>          Third Address -- May 30, 1871.
>          appendices.
>          footnotes.
>    30. 1872 -- On Authority (E)
>    31. 1875 -- Critique of the Gotha Program
>    32. 1877 -- Socialism: Utopian and Scientific (E)/
>          1892 Introduction/
>          Early Socialist Utopians.
>          Dialectical Method.
>          Historical Materialism.
>          notes.
>    33. 1879 -- Chicago Tribune Interview with Marx
>    34. 1879 -- Reformists in Germany's Social-Democratic party (ME)
>    35. 1882 -- Bruno Bauer and Early Christianity (E)
>    36. 1883 -- Engels' Speech At Karl Marx's Grave (E)
>    37. 1886 -- The End of Classical German Philosophy (E)/
>          1888 Introduction
>          Hegelian System vs Dialectical Method
>          Idealism vs Materialism
>          Feuerbach's "Idealism"
>          Marx's "Materialism"
>          footnotes
>          Appendix: Theses of Feuerbach (M)
>    38. 1894 -- The Peasant Question in France and Germany (E)/
>    39. 1895 -- Capital III: Law of Value and Rate of Profit (E)/
>    40. OTHERS/
>          DeLeon
>          Lenin
>          Trotsky
>
>(Please note: Though this archive has a small DeLeon/Lenin/Trotsky
>section, it is not intended to store programmatic material from modern
>political organizations, so please don't ask.  There is already exists
>an interesting collection of such material at etext.archive.umich.edu,
>maintained by Paul Southworth (pauls at umich.edu).)
>

Juan Inigo
jinigo at inscri.org.ar

     ------------------



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