Challenge to Cockshott

Louis N Proyect lnp3 at columbia.edu
Sat Sep 2 14:55:08 MDT 1995


Louis: Paul is absolutely correct about the relatively low level of
repression in People's China. I think Mao's role as revolutionary, just as
Ho Chi Minh's, is something that has to be fully evolved by Marxism. I think
neither the hagiography by people like William Hinton, nor the standard
Trotskyite denunciations of Chinese "Stalinism" do justice to this
phenomenon.

I do think the Shining Path has been guilty of widespread,
indiscriminate murder of political opponents on the left. I had been
deeply involved with Salvadoran revolutionary politics throughout most of
the 1980's and may want to comment on the incidents that Paul is
referring to, if he can pinpoint them. There, in fact, was brutal
factional struggle in the FMLN which resulted in the tragic death of
poet-revolutionary Roque Dalton. But I would not describe this as typical
of Salvadoran politics.

On Fri, 1 Sep 1995, Paul Cockshott wrote:

> Others indulge in this sort of thing too without meeting quite
> the same condemnation. Lenin and Trotsky did not have too many
> qualms about the actions of the Cheka. Reading the postings
> in reg.latinamerica I see that the widely applauded Farabundo
> Marti liberation group launched armed attacks on 'ultra left'
> guerillas that resulted in hundreds of casualties.
>
> As a 'dictator' Mao was somewhat unconventional in making remarks
> like 'rebellion is always justified' and inciting anarchy of
> an unprecedented proportion. One of the striking differences
> between inner party conflicts in China and in Russia, was that
> in the Chinese case political opponents tended to come out
> bruised but alive. Mao did not have Deng or Lui shot.
>
>
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>
>
>


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