ANNOUNCEMENT: Restructuring of Spoon marxism space

rakesh bhandari djones at uclink.berkeley.edu
Sat Aug 24 13:38:25 MDT 1996


I would like to propose a list which focuses on Marx's *Capital* and which
would include discussion of such sub-themes:

1.direct analysis of Marx's writings.
2.discussion of  works in which the method or basic concepts or important
themes of *Capital* is taken up
3.discussion of the relation of *Capital* to (for want of better term)
other kinds of knowledge
4.discussion of the critiques or revisions or developments of Marx's *Capital*
5.analyses of new developments or stages of capitalist development on the
basis of concepts of *Capital* or critical discussion of the limits of
*Capital* to account for certain developments
6.further development of *Capital* as a critique of various discourses
7.discussion and evaluation of the implications for practice  of Marx's
*Capital*

Though I can think of several important works for the discussion of each
sub-theme, I would also like to propose that the list begin in mid
September a reading of Moishe Postone's *Time, Labor and Social Domination:
a reinterpretation of Marx's critical theory*.  (Cambridge Univ Press,
1993). It is now out in paperback for about $20, and has received high
praise from  David McLellan, Bob Jessop, Robert Heilbroner, Jeane Schuler,
Simon Clarke, Rick Wolff, J Fracchia, and Martin Jay.

I do not mean to suggest on the basis of these eminent authorities that
Postone's work is the most important new work on Marx.  I must admit that
this proposal is convenient for me as I have been invited to be a member of
a reading group on this text by  students of Martin Jay, a professor here
at Berkeley,  and Alfred Schmidt (author of *The Concept of Nature in
Marx*).  However, I most certainly do think the book is worth reading and
debating.

Perhaps after this book, we could discuss a work in Marxist political
economy or social theory grappling with current economic and technological
developments: Guglielmo Carchedi's *Frontiers of Political Economy*, Samir
Amin's *Maldevelopment*, Elmar Altvater's *The Future of the Market*,
Werner Bonefeld and John Holloway, ed. *Global Capital, National State and
the Politics of Money*, Andre Gorz's *Critique of Economic Reason* or
Makatoh Itoh's *The World Economic Crisis and Japanese Capitalism*?

Rakesh








     --- from list marxism at lists.village.virginia.edu ---




More information about the Marxism mailing list