Problems of Maoism and Capitalist Restoration

Rubyg580 at aol.com Rubyg580 at aol.com
Thu Jun 13 18:28:58 MDT 1996


In a message dated 96-06-12 03:06:00 EDT, you write:

>Isn't the degeneration of a socialist country sadly one of those
>gritty arkward contradictory processes that spoil our purist
>dreams? Don't we have to live in the present, the actual
>historical process going on before our eyes, and prepare for
>the future?

The problem isn't the degeneration of socialist states, it's always
been an abrupt change in the class interests leading them.  This
happened in the USSR when Khruschov took over, and in China
with the arrest of the "Gang of 4".  It took a while to dismantle all
the socialist structures in these countries, but the point where the
DIRECTION of development changed can be pinpointed with some
precision.

Socialism is, by definition, the transition from one form of society--
capitalism--to another: communism, classless society.  If overall
leadership is in the hands of the proletariat, through a party with a
truly proletarian line, then the overall direction of social, political
and economic development will be toward more non-comodity
production; the material needs of the people rather than the
economic needs of profit being the driving force of production, etc.

If that leadership is defeated, then the direction of development
can be easily reversed: Toward greater divisions and inequality
between different sections of the people, but primarily toward putting
profit back in command of the economy, and thus of the politics, the
culture, social life, etc.

How to keep leadership firmly in proletarian hands is the key question
for communists to solve.  Mao promoted the Great Proletarian Cultural
Revolution as a *dire necessity* to prevent the restoration of capitalism,
which it did, for ten years until after his death.  The PCP projects starting

right off with a cultural revolution after power is seized throughout the
country, in order to get the jump on the capitalist roaders.  Also the
concept of the militarization of the party is specifically with this in mind:

to prevent the capitalist restoration.

The fact that the PCP has been able to recover from the blow of
losing their primary leader, and has been able to continue to advance,
s as far as I know, unprecedented in the history of the communist
movement.  The loss of a leader, especially the primary leader, creates
the most vulnerable situation for the revolutionary forces.  Note that it
was after the death of Stalin that capitalism was restored in the Soviet
Union, and after Mao's death in China.

Gina/Detroit


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