"The Emir of Afghanistan" and the "Foundations of Leninism"

cwellen cwellen at pen.k12.va.us
Tue Oct 8 22:49:32 MDT 1996


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Greetings to all comrades from Wei En Lin


Re:  "The Emir of Afghanistan"

Chris Burford has quoted this passage from the "Foundations of
Leninism."

"The struggle that
the Emir of Afghanistan is waging
for the independence of
Afghanistan is objectively
a *revolutionary* struggle,
despite the monarchist views
of the Emir and his
associates, for it weakens,
disintegrates and undermines
imperialism....."

Is this sentence either grammatical or logical?  Can anyone find a
sentence in the writings of Karl Marx or F. Engels which expresses the
same sentiment?

And even if the sentence were correct in the historical context in which
it was written, can it be asserted that the triumph of Taliban strikes a
blow against imperialism?

Have we not gone past the stage of naked imperialism to a far subtler
form of exploitation wrought by  Transnational Capitalism on the working
people of the world?   Exploitation by the IMF, the World Bank, and the
owners of the controlling shares in the largest multinational
corporations)

How does the victory of the Taliban in anyway undermine imperialism or
neo-imperialism?  It seems to enhance the power of transnational
capital, which can easily exploit the differences Tajiks and Pushtans,
between Ultra-right fundamentalists, Iranian  revolutionary Shiite
fundamentalists, and moderate Sunni Muslims.

Do not forget that the most reactionary regimes, ie Saudi Arabia and the
Gulf States tend to ally with the US;  it is the more revolutionary
regimes, within the Arab and Muslim World, (ie Libya, Syria, Iraq and
Iran), that oppose the hegemony of NATO and their associated economic
interests.  Libya, Iraq, and Iran are despised by the US elite mostly
because they have nationalized their oil resources. Afghanistan has no
such resources, so it will ultimately side with the US in all
likelihood.  According the The Washington Post, negotiations are going
on right now.  Note how the US has been very sparing of its criticisms
of the Taliban.  The US hopes to play the various regional interests off
of one another.

If by some historical fluke, the Taliban revolution spread throughout
the entire region, causing upheaval in all the feudal Islamic states,
unifying the Muslim World in its cause against Western exploitation,
then Taliban may certainly be seen as disruptive to International
Capital.  But that does not seem likely; and it would not be very
desireable, especially if it meant unifying all the Muslim world under
an ultra-fundamentalist ideology which denied women even the most basic
rights.


--Wei En Lin

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