The Emir of Afghanistan

Hinrich Kuhls kls at unidui.uni-duisburg.de
Sun Oct 13 11:03:06 MDT 1996


On Fri, 11 Oct 96, Chris Burford wrote:

>>From the point of view of this agenda, radical islam is=20
>a reaction against the culture of commodity based civil society
>as much as it is a progressive nucleus of political resistance
>to neo-liberalism, and imperialism.
>
>Where the Taliban lie on this I do not know. A good marxist
>analysis of the roots of the conflict and why they were able to=20
>overthrow the Kabul government would be fascinating.

In the mean time let's have a look into the left-liberal press:

     [http://www.fr-aktuell.de/940/T940004E.HTM]

     ARE THE TALEBAN TOOLS IN THE BATTLE FOR OIL?

     Access to oil reserves also underlies fighting in Afghanistan

     ------------------------------------------------------------------
     By Pierre Simonitsch
     ------------------------------------------------------------------
     Geneva - One underlying cause of the fighting in Afghanistan is
     the struggle to secure access via pipeline to the rich oil and
     natural gas reserves of the Caspian Sea, United Nations diplomats
     in Geneva believe. Turkey, Iran, Pakistan, Russia and the USA are
     all involved in the tussle.

     Nicholas Burns, US State Department spokesman, denied that a high
     ranking government representative had flown to Kabul for talks
     with the Taleban militia, but the department has not denied
     reports that the US oil giant Unocal has been given the go-ahead
     from the new holders of power in Kabul to build a pipeline from
     Turkmenistan via Afghanistan to Pakistan. It would lead from
     Krasnovodsk on the Caspian Sea to Karachi on the Indian Ocean
     coast.

     President Saparmurat Nijazov of Turkmenistan stayed away from the
     summit of affected CIS states held in the Kazakhstan capital
     Almaty. UN diplomats are convinced that the president has already
     made a pact with the Taleban and their behind the scenes
     supporters.

     The UN and its organisations have spent billions of dollars on
     redeveloping Afghanistan, on mine clearing and caring for more
     than four million refugees. High ranking UN officials are now
     being forced to look on with gnashing teeth as their efforts come
     to nothing and the international organisation is outmanoeuvred
     once more.

     Members of the UN Security Council managed to draw out the delay
     in issuing a statement on the situation in Afghanistan until Kabul
     fell. Jose Ayala Lasso, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights,
     issued only a polite warning to Taleban leaders to comply with the
     international convention on equal rights for women.

     UN Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali limited himself to a
     threat to withdraw aid. Some big powers clearly do not want the UN
     to involve itself with the situation in Afghanistan.

     A draft Security Council resolution condemning blatant human
     rights violations in Afghanistan was last week blocked by China's
     veto. The Beijing government rejected any "meddling in the
     internal affairs of sovereign states".

     The US government is now waving a threatening finger at the
     Taleban after events in Kabul triggered an echo in the press. Even
     Pakistan's Premier Benazir Bhutto made a statement - rather
     delayed - concerning women. Yet geo-strategic interests are
     stronger than worries over human rights.

     A Pakistani delegation is currently in Turkmenistan for talks over
     the pipeline. President Faruk Laghan of Pakistan is to travel to
     Tadzikistan and Uzbekistan at the end of this month. He wants to
     convince their governments that the Taleban do not harbour
     territorial ambitions. But the main item on the agenda will be the
     construction of roads and oil pipelines through Afghanistan to
     Pakistan.

     Iran is also pursuing realpolitik. The mullahs have revoked
     support of Tadzikistan's rebel Islamic movement and are now
     attempting a policy of reconciliation with the Tadzik government.

     The Taleban are just the tools in this battle for power an oil. In
     return for modern weapons and logistical aid they probably had to
     promise Pakistan they would recognise the border established by
     the British colonial power - a step which all Afghan governments
     up until now have refused.

     ENDS               Copyright =A996,Frankfurter Rundschau and gnns









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