China's "Communist" Status

Nestor Miguel Gorojovsky nestor at SPAMsisurb.filo.uba.ar
Wed Oct 6 15:27:14 MDT 1999



El  5 Oct 99 a las 21:26, Boone nos dice(n):

> >Geez. You ask a lot.
>
> Questions posed to the right people are the key to
> understanding... remember, I am new here...
>
> >Near the end of Marx's life a New York reporter
> >interviewed him and at the end of the interview came out
> >with the question, What is? After a long pause, Marx
> >answered: "Struggle."
>
> >
> >Will that do for a start?
>
> Well, to put it quite simply, no. I was looking for
> somewhat of a more profound answer... Call me ignorant but
> I have no idea what the above statement means. If you're
> willing to explain I'm willing to listen...
>
> For anyone who missed it, here was my origninal message:

Dear friend,


The answer was very profound, in fact. What Carrol did was
to sum up into a single word the basic message conveyed by
Marx in his Theses on Feuerbach, namely the one that states
that philosophers have up to this day attempted to
understand the world, now it was time for them to struggle
to change it.

It is not a crude slogan, it is stating the essential and
_necessary_ role that action has in the understanding.
"Struggle" in this context means no knowledge can be
attained unless within the active and living framework of
conscious, engaged and committed action towards the
realization of socialism.

But then, you may say, aren't these guys circular in their
position? And we would answer "Not at all, only that there
is not a single possibility to understand a world we are
not engaged into. Understanding is a process whereby one
passes from the abstract to the concrete and viceversa all
the time".  As Marx said, also (modernizing the language a
little bit):  There are no freeways to knowledge.

Anyway, if you still feel dissatisfied, let us begin by
stating that what socialism is after is, at the very least,
extending to the realm of economic relationships the three
great banners of the French bourgeois revolution:
"Liberte, egalite, fraternite".  Do you prefer this rather
longish and somehow misguiding explanation as a starter,
now?

A hug and a warm welcome,

Nestor.









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