Commercialization of agriculture and peasent women

Xxxx Xxxxx Xxxxxx xxxxxxxx at xxxxxxxxxxx.xxx
Tue Aug 1 13:37:58 MDT 2000


 
http://www.sls.wau.nl/crds/conab1_gs.html#anchor1046554

Gunduz-Hosgor, Ayse, Dept. of Sociology, Middle East Technical University,
Ankara, Turkey

Women's diverse positions in rural transformation: evidence from the village
Abazli, Turkey. In recent decades, there has been an increasing awareness that
the agricultural policies in the Turkish Republic had different impacts on men
and women. Although the evidence is not conclusive in the literature, the
studies indicate that women in rural areas were affected mainly by two sources
stemming from the economic policies of the post-Kemalist governments: (1)
through modernisation in farming technology and commercial marketing, and (2)
through migration. Generally speaking, the modernisation of farming technology
in agriculture and commercial marketing tended to reproduce and intensify the
sexual division of labour to the disadvantage of peasant women. The change from
traditional to modern farming tended to enhance men's prestige at the expense of
women by widening the gap in their level of knowledge and training. These
studies also demonstrate that the process of change favoured men as sources of
authority in the household and the local centres of power. The studies, however,
are mostly silent about women's diverse positions in rural areas. The authors
assumed that rural women have the same life experiences in the process of
transformation. In order to contribute new evidence, the aim of this study is to
show that women themselves have also different experiences in the process of
rural transformation. The research project is carried out in one of the central
Anatolian villages, Abazli, which is located 75 kilometres from Ankara (capital
city). There reside 2,350 people in 228 households. Through applying purposive
sampling procedure, three households, which consist of women from different
generations, are chosen as case studies. Life History method is used while
analysing these sharply contrasting cases. In this way, women's different views
and their diverse experiences in the process of rural transformation could be
captured.

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Xxxx Xxxxx Xxxxxx
PhD Student
Department of Political Science
SUNY at Albany
Nelson A. Rockefeller College
135 Western Ave.; Milne 102
Albany, NY 12222
 



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