The Ecuadorian Revolution

Jose G. Perez jgperez at SPAMfreepcmail.com
Fri Jan 28 06:47:15 MST 2000



>>IMHO to speak about indians in LA is to speak about peasants and the land
question, as Mariategui has written. It has very little to do with the Civil
Rights and black power movements in USA.<<

Julio,

    I think it is dangerous in the extreme for the revolutionary movement to
be insensitive to the *national* aspect of the question, just as those who
see only the national issues but not the underlying class questions are
mistaken.

    At any rate, it is clear that given the post World War II movement
against colonialism and national oppression on a world scale, of which the
U.S. Black movement was a byproduct, a component, and in many ways a turning
point, the evidence is overwhelming that these national movements cannot
simply be dismissed or liquidated into the "class" question. In many ways,
national struggles have been the sharpest expression of the class struggle
for the past half century.

    Chiapas, the Ecuadorian movement, the Guatemalan Guerrilla Army of the
Poor, the autonomy for Nicaragua's Atlantic Coast -- this is the way things
are. That is the *reality* of the class struggle today.

    I said the U.S. Black movement marked a turning point, and I mean it in
this sense. This movement marked the awakening or a new prominence of
struggle by oppressed nations, nationalities, national minorities, ethnic,
linguistic and regional groups who lacked or had lost some or many of the
characteristics that we associate with the archetypal fully formed nation
created in Europe as capitalism developed. Of course it wasn't just the
Black movement, the same forces and influences that were propelling and
shaping the Black struggle here were also at work among native americans,
among the nationalist population in the north of Ireland, among the Basques,
etc.

    To argue that because the class struggle assumed certain forms nearly a
century ago, Marxists today should ignore the actual, living forms of the
class struggle as it actually in the real world manifests itself is
ahistorical just as it would be unmaterialist to ignore the underlying class
basis of the struggle, whatever its forms.

José

----- Original Message -----
From: "Julio Fernández Baraibar" <julfb at sinectis.com.ar>
To: <marxism at lists.panix.com>
Sent: Thursday, January 27, 2000 3:50 PM
Subject: RE: The Ecuadorian Revolution


> Louis wrote:
> > There is another important aspect to the Ecuador struggle. It will serve
> as
> > an inspiration to Indians from Argentina to the Arctic to fight for
equal
> > rights. When a minority can shake up society the way it has in Ecuador,
it
> > will very likely have the same ramifications as the Civil Rights and
black
> > power movements had in the United States.
>
> IMHO to speak about indians in LA is to speak about peasants and the land
> question, as Mariategui has written. It has very little to do with the
Civil
> Rights and black power movements in USA.
> Julio FB
>
>







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