An ominous omen

Nestor Miguel Gorojovsky gorojovsky at SPAMinea.com.ar
Sun May 14 10:32:47 MDT 2000


En relación a An ominous omen,
el 14 May 00, a las 10:18, Louis Proyect dijo:

> New York Times, May 14, 2000
>
> RECKONINGS / By PAUL KRUGMAN
>
> Nihon Keizai Shambles
>

...

>
> It's a sad story, which carries a moral for us all: technology is not
> a magic elixir. The Internet, mobile phones and all that are exciting
> and important, but those who count on them to solve all their problems
> are likely to be disappointed.
>
>

This is a final advice, which would do marvels on our Latin American
"statespeople (i.e. statesmen/women)" were it not that they are such
a bunch of idiotic rats. The current Argentinian Head of Cabinet
Rodolfo Terragno, an almost archetypical son of what would probably
be termed our provincial Illustrated Bourgeoisie (that is, a
chatterbox, a serious-sounding fool, and an erudite in most things
that we Argentinians do not need at all), used to explain, during the
last months of the Alfonsín administration (that is, by 1988/89) that
we Argentinians would be saved by the trilogy of "cybernetics,
biotechology, and electronics", or something similar).

This technological mysticism seems to be, however, the only way out
of despair when the bourgeois economist begins to face the objective
limits to growth within the system, a system that cannot be kept in a
zero growth state because it dies. The mystification can be duly
replaced by other idols. Upon the Salta events these days, Terragno
declared in the Argentinian Parliament that if the Government would
agree to the demands of the piqueteros in Tartagal, the "country risk
(riesgo país)" of Argentina would rise, and then this would run
directly against the interests of the piqueteros.

By the way, this brings to light the essential equation of colonial
thinking: "Argentina needs foreign capital to grow, we must behave,
capital owners will punish us otherwise".  If I am a colonialist,
this line of ideas is my natural way of thinking, but if I am a
colonial, this line of ideas is what constitutes the sepoy. And you
can perfectly follow this ideology while presenting yourself as a
Marxist, in which case you become a sepoy Marxist, a species far too
common in Latin America.





Néstor Miguel Gorojovsky
gorojovsky at inea.com.ar





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