Then and Now

Henry C.K. Liu hliu at mindspring.com
Wed Dec 19 22:03:37 MST 2001


Bush skimmed through the pages. Then he signed. What he signed was the
death sentence on what there was of American democracy.  For this decree
suspended the civil liberties of the US constitution and inaugurated the
Police State. As Ashcroft had prophesied to me the night before, a new
era for the United  States had begun.

I told him that the wave of arrests in America had caused rumours to
spread both in Washington and abroad that he was planning a great
slaughter of his enemies. A kind of St. Bartholomew's night.
Again Ashcroft gave me an answer which could hardly help his cause.

"I need no St. Bartholomew's night," he sneered. "Under the decrees for
the Defence of the People and the State" (the one signed by President
Bush on September 12th) "we have set up tribunals which will try enemies
of the state and deal with them in a way which will put an end to
conspiracies." In other words he was going to have a legal slaughter of
his enemies. I asked him whether the suspension of civil liberties in
America was to be permanent. This time his answer was more diplomatic
and considerably less candid.

"No," he said. "when the Terrorism menace is stamped out the normal
order of things shall return. Our laws were too liberal for me to be
able to deal effectively and swiftly with this Islamic underworld.
But I myself am only too anxious for the normal state of affairs to be
restored as quickly as possible. First, however, we must crush Terrorism
out of existence."

That was a very elastic promise. In fact, the civil liberties suppressed
in that WTC decree were never restored in Bush's lifetime. Nor do I
believe he ever meant to restore them. For he needed the police terror
in order to discipline the American people into readiness for the great
war of revenge.


> <<Hindenburg skimmed through the pages. Then he signed. What he
> signed was the death sentence on what there was of German democracy.
> For this decree suspended the civil liberties of the Weimar
> constitution and inaugurated the Police State. As Hitler had
> prophesied to me the night before, a new era for Germany had begun. >>

>
> <<I told him that the wave of arrests in Germany had caused rumours
> to spread both in Berlin and abroad that he was planning a great
> slaughter of his enemies. A kind of German St. Bartholomew's night.
> Again Hitler gave me an answer which could hardly help his cause.
>
> "I need no St. Bartholomew's night," he sneered. "Under the decrees
> for the Defence of the People and the State" (the one signed by
> President Hindenburg on February 28th) "we have set up tribunals
> which will try enemies of the state and deal with them in a way which
> will put an end to conspiracies." In other words he was going to have
> a legal slaughter of his enemies. I asked him whether the suspension
> of civil liberties in Germany was to be permanent. This time his
> answer was more diplomatic and considerably less candid.
>
> "No," he said. "when the Communist menace is stamped out the normal
> order of things shall return. Our laws were too liberal for me to be
> able to deal effectively and swiftly with this Bolshevik underworld.
> But I myself am only too anxious for the normal state of affairs to
> be restored as quickly as possible. First, however, we must crush
> Communism out of existence."
>
> That was a very elastic promise. In fact, the civil liberties
> suppressed in that Reichstag Fire decree were never restored in
> Hitler's lifetime. Nor do I believe he ever meant to restore them.
> For he needed the police terror in order to discipline the German
> people into readiness for the great war of revenge. >>
>


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