Suggestions for anti-corporate-globalisation course?

Patrick Bond pbond at wn.apc.org
Thu Jun 21 05:39:00 MDT 2001


Hi all, I'm running a course in Toronto next month. Any suggestions 
for good material I've left off so far? Still time to drag in some 
new ideas...

INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY AND ECOLOGY SUMMER SCHOOL

July 3-14, 2001 -- York University, Toronto, Canada

CHALLENGING CAPITALIST GLOBALIZATION: 
TARGETS, OPPORTUNITIES, CONTRADICTIONS

Course Description:

This summer school course provides an opportunity to confront the main
lines of analysis, critique and strategic resistance emerging in
relation to what has become known as "globalization."

Using mainly a critical literature, the course begins by surveying
debates surrounding the nature of the capital-driven globalization
process said to be central to defining the parameters of contemporary
international political economy. We ask, first of all, whether the
current period is one of corporate/financial power, or vulnerability
("capitalist crisis"), or both?

We next establish different foundational positions on key strategic
problems, such as the relationship of current to previous epochs of
globalization, the roles and capacities of states, and competing
traditions of analysing the Third World's international economic
integration. A special session on Canada's experience with learned
"impotence" will be hosted by journalist/commentator Linda McQuaig.

The course then focuses on various debates surrounding progressive
resistance--some as dramatic as the "Battle of Seattle" and similar
confrontations in Prague, Washington and Quebec City, others bound up
in global-scale reformism, others more modest and localized (for
example, to particular socio-environmental sectors) but no less worthy
of attention -- that the corporate globalization process has given
rise to.

For example, we consider prospects for international institutional
reform, in the context of the "region" as both resistance and
facilitator of corporate globalization, and the (often conflictual)
relationships between radical activist initiatives and sustained
NGO/labour engagements. The nature of the embryonic "global state"
comes under scrutiny, along with the necessary question, "fix it or
nix it"?

Indeed, the world-wide scope of resistance to corporate globalization
will be emphasized throughout, highlighting common structural
processes and political patterns that are evident across the world.
Several cross-cutting case studies--international finance, access to
AIDS drugs, and resistance to mega-dams and water
privatization--illustrate the way targets are understood,
opportunities are created, contradictions flower, and patterns develop
that allow broader, more general strategies to emerge.

Yet simultaneously, the specific (and often unique) socio-economic
conditions, political traditions, discourses, and strategies/tactics
that prevail in each setting must be carefully considered. The
geographical areas of N.America, Korea/E.Asia and Southern Africa will
provide the main material for study, but other instances of resistance
in India (Narmada anti-dams) and Mexico (Zapatistas) will be appraised
as well. (The issue of how Northern/Western progressives show
solidarity with Southern movements arises via a case study of
e-solidarity with the struggles of Chiapas.)

As a result, we will ask whether sometimes-convergent, 
sometimes-divergent campaigns associated with opposition to 
globalization are and/or can be sustainable, cumulative and 
generalizable. In short, is the phenomenon of international 
resistance truly a "movement" -- a Mobilization for Global Justice as
it was termed in Washington in April 2000 -- or instead merely a set
of discrete, disconnected and untenable issues/organizations which may
never achieve a lasting alliance and gain sufficient power to make To
answer requires considering the movement's key "components" (such as
the labour, environmental and feminist contributions) and its
"cultural" and `intellectual' groundings, as well as some central
strategic/tactical debates about the way forward.

And these matters take us directly back to where we began, i.e., to a
concern with the balance of social forces and sensitivity to "scale
politics." Matters of "rescaling" -- the relative importance of local,
national, regional, hemispheric and global activities and the nature
and degree of the interrelationship amongst struggles at these
different levels -- are at the heart of international political
economy. And various contradictions said to haunt the new global
resistance movement--the tensions between In general, however, the
course proceeds with the assumption that resisting the process of
globalization from above, and theorizing that process, together
represent relatively new undertakings (notwithstanding formal
traditions of international resistance to corporate rule that goes
back at least to mid-19th century Europe). Both analytical and
practical controversies have arisen in the recent international
literature. The resulting dilemmas continue to make the work of
alliance-building between various forces extremely challenging. Thus
the course must proceed with the fine combination of modesty and
boldness that such a challenging exercise, at once scientific but also
profoundly political, demands.

Reading List:

It is strongly recommended that participants purchase the following
two volumes, which are on sale at discounted prices at the York
University bookstore, as well as the course kit which contains all
other "Required Readings" as listed in the seminar outline which
follows:

Jeremy Brecher, Tim Costello and Brendan Smith, Globalization from
Below, Cambridge, South End Press, 2000.

Leo Panitch and Colin Leys (Eds), Socialist Register 2001: The Global
Working Class at the Millennium, London, Merlin and New York, Monthly
Review Press, 2000.

Course kit, IPEE Summer School, July, 2001

(In addition, copies of the "Recommended Readings" listed below can be
found, in most instances, at the Reserve Desk in the Scott library) 

Outline of seminar sessions:

Note that seminar sessions will be held every weekday morning between
July 3 and July 13 from 9:30 to 12:30 in the Verney Seminar Room of
the Department of Political Science (Sixth Floor, South Ross). Note as
well that there is an additional seminar session scheduled for the
afternoon of July 4 (1:30 to 4:30 PM). Students will also be expected
to attend, as part of the course, an all-day Workshop/Conference on
Saturday, July 14 (see below).

SESSION 1: Tuesday, July 3, AM

GLOBALIZATION, POWER AND VULNERABILITY

REQUIRED READINGS (PLEASE NOTE: participants will be expected to have
familiarized themselves with the required readings assigned for the
first day in time for discussion in this first seminar)

 Brecher, J., T.Costello and B.Smith (2000), Globalization from Below:
 The Power of Solidarity, Boston, South End Press; Chapter 1,
 Globalization and its Specter (pp.1-17).

 Harvey, D. (2000), Spaces of Hope, Berkeley, University of California
 Press, Chapter 4, "Contemporary Globalization" (pp.53-72).

 Swyndegdouw, E. (2000), "Authoritarian Governance, Power and the
 Politics of Rescaling," Society and Space, 18 (pp.63-76).

RECOMMENDED READINGS

 Brenner, R. (2001), The Boom and the Bubble, draft of chapters in
 forthcoming book, from London, Verso; Chapter 6, "The Contours and
 Character of the Boom" (pp.79-86); Chapter 7: "It Can't Happen Here"
 (pp.87-94).

 Gindin, S. (2000), "Turning Points and Starting Points," in L.Panitch
 and C.Leys (Eds), Working Classes, Global Realities: Socialist
 Register 2001, London, Merlin and New York, Monthly Review
 (pp.343-366).

 Shutt, H. (1998), The Trouble with Capitalism: An Enquiry into the
 Causes of Global Economic Failure, London, Zed; Chapter 8, "Coping
 with Capital Glut" (pp.110-132); Chapter 12, "Can the Profits System
 be Saved?" (pp.182-187).

 Hardt, M. and A.Negri (2000), Empire, Cambridge, Harvard University
 Press; Chapter 3.6, "Capitalist Sovereignty, or Administering the
 Society of Control" (pp.325-350). 

 Castells, M. (2000), "Information Technology and Global Capitalism,"
 in W.Hutton and A.Giddens (Eds), On the Edge: Living with Global
 Capitalism, London, Jonathan Cape (pp.52-74).

***

SESSION 2: Wednesday, July 4, AM

GLOBALIZATION, IMPERIALISM, THE STATE 

REQUIRED READINGS

 Biel, R. (2000), The New Imperialism: Crises and Contradictions in
 North/South Relations, London, Zed; Chapter 4, "Development Theory
 versus Practice" (pp.72-97).

 Kagarlitsky, B. (2000), The Twilight of Globalization: Property,
 State and Capitalism, London, Pluto; Chapter 1, "The State and
 Globalization" (pp.1-39).

RECOMMENDED READINGS

 Lenin, V. (1917)[1975], Imperialism: The Highest Stage of Capitalism,
 Beijing, Foreign Languages Press; Chapter 6, "The Division of the
 World Amongst the Great Powers" (pp. 89-104); Chapter 7, "Imperialism
 as a Special Stage of Capitalism" (pp.104-118); Chapter 10, "The
 Place of Imperialism in History" (pp.148-155).

 Zyuganov, G. (2001), "Globalization: A Dead End or Way Out?, (n.d.,
 unpublished paper at http://www.zyuganov.ru)

 Ugarteche, O. (2000), The False Dilemma: Globalization: Opportunity
 or Threat, London, Zed; Chapter 1, "Debates on Globalization and
 International Trade" (pp.1-20); "Epilogue" (pp.201-215)

 Burkett, P. and M. Hart-Landsberg (2000), Development, Crisis and
 Class Struggle: Learning from Japan and East Asia, New York,
 St.Martin's Press; Chapter 1, "A Marxist Perspective on the
 Neoliberal versus Structural-Institutionalist Debate" (pp.13-24).

 Thomas, C. (2000), "Globalisation as Paradigm Shift: Response from
 the South," in D.Benn and K.Hall (Eds), Globalisation: A Calculus of
 Inequality, Kingston, Ian Randle (pp.8-22).

 Castro, F. (2000), "Address to the South Summit," Monthly Review, 52,
 3 (pp.149-160).

***

NOTE: SPECIAL AFTERNOON SESSION

SESSION 3: Wednesday, July 4, P.M.

GLOBALIZATION AND THE CANADIAN NATION-STATE

GUEST SPEAKER: LINDA MCQUAIG

REQUIRED READING

 Linda McQuaig (1997 and 2001): some of Mcquaig's most recent
 (published and unpublished) work, including several National Post
 columns, will be distributed at the first class session, on 3 July;
 in addition the concluding chapter from McQuaig's 1997 book, The Cult
 of Impotence, is included in the course-pack.

 Greg Albo (1997), "A World Market of Opportunities? Capitalist
 Obstacles and Left Economic Policy," in Leo Panitch (ed.), Ruthless
 Criticism of All that Exists: Socialist Register 1997, London, Merlin
 and New York, Monthly Review, pp.5-47. 

RECOMMENDED READING

 Linda McQuaig (1997),  The Cult of Impotence: selling the myth of
 powerlessness in the global economy, Toronto, Viking

 Stephen McBride and John Shields (1997), Dismantling a Nation: the
 transition to corporate rule in Canada (2nd Ed'n), Halifax, Fermwood,


***

SESSION 4: Thursday, July 5, AM

REFORMING GLOBAL PROCESSES?

REQUIRED READINGS

 Young, I. (2000), Inclusion and Democracy, Oxford, Oxford University
 Press, Chapter 7, "Self-Determination and Global Democracy"
 (pp.236-275).

 Hutton, W. and A.Giddens (2000), "Fighting Back," in W.Hutton and
 A.Giddens (Eds), On the Edge: Living with Global Capitalism, London,
 Jonathan Cape (pp.213-223).

RECOMMENDED READINGS

 Soros, G. (1998), The Crisis of Global Capitalism: Open Society
 Endangered, New York, Public Affairs; Chapter 10, "The International
 Context" (pp.214-225); Chapter 11, "The Open Society Agenda"
 (pp.226-240).

 Boswell, T. and C.Chase-Dunn (2000), The Spiral of Capitalism and
 Socialism, Boulder, Lynn Reiner; "Conclusion".

***

SESSION 5: Friday, July 6, AM

ANALYSES AND DISCOURSES OF RESISTANCE

REQUIRED READINGS

 Biel, R. (2000), The New Imperialism: Crises and Contradictions in
 North/South Relations, London, Zed; Chapter 13, "Globalisation versus
 Regionalism" (pp.262-287); Chapter 14, "Grassroots Social Movements
 and the Prospects for a New Social Order" (pp.288-327).

 Kagarlitsky, B. (2000), The Return of Radicalism: Reshaping the Left
 Institutions, London, Pluto; Chapter 3, "The Third Left or the Third
 Socialism" (pp.98-148).

RECOMMENDED READINGS

 Harvey, D. (2000), Spaces of Hope, Berkeley, University of California
 Press, Chapter 5, "Uneven Geographical Developments and Human Rights
 (pp.73-94).

 Hardt, M. and A.Negri (2000), Empire, Cambridge, Harvard UP; Chapter
 4.3, "The Multitude Against Empire" (pp. 393-413).

***

SESSION 6: Monday, July 9, AM

INTERNATIONAL REFORM/REACTION: CASES OF INTERNATIONAL FINANCE, AND
ACCESS TO PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCTS

REQUIRED READINGS

 Bello, W., K.Malhotra, N.Bullard and M.Mezzera (2000), "Notes on the
 Ascendancy and Regulation of Speculative Capital," in W.Bello,
 K.Malhotra and N.Bullard (Eds), Global Finance, London, Zed
 (pp.1-26).

 Bond, P. (2001), Against Global Apartheid: South Africa meets the
 World Bank, IMF and International Finance, London, Pluto and Cape
 Town, UCT Press; Chapter 8, "Pharmaceutical Corporations and US
 Imperialism."

RECOMMENDED READINGS

 Economic Commission for Africa (2000), Finance for Development in
 Africa: An Issues Paper, Paper presented at the Eighth Session of the
 ECA Conference of Ministers of Finance, Addis Ababa, 21-22 November.

 Bond, P. (2000), "Local not Global Finance for Development," Paper
 presented to the NGO Parallel Session to the G20 Finance Ministers
 Summit, Montreal.

 Bond, P. (2001), Against Global Apartheid: South Africa meets the
 World Bank, IMF and International Finance, London, Pluto and Cape
 Town, UCT Press; Chapter 9, "Civil Society Conquest, State Failure."

 LeCarré, J. (2001), The Constant Gardener, London, Hodder and
 Stoughton; especially Chapter 12 (pp.247-266).

***

SESSION 7: Tuesday, July 10, AM

INTERNATIONAL REFORM/REACTION: CASES OF WATER, MEGA-DAMS AND SERVICES
PRIVATIZATION

GUEST SPEAKER: KAREN BAKKER (Oxford University)

REQUIRED READINGS

 McCully, P. (2001), "How to Use a Trilateral Network: An Activist's
 Perspective on the World Commission on Dams," Paper presented to the
 Yale University Agrarian Studies Program Colloquium, 19 January.

 Karliner, J. (1997), The Corporate Planet: Ecology and Politics in
 the Age of Globalization, San Francisco, Sierra Club Books; Chapter
 2, "The Greening of Global Reach: Corporate Environmentalism Comes of
 Age" (pp.30-57)

RECOMMENDED READINGS

 Bakker, K. and D. Hemson (2000), "Privatising Water: Hydropolitics in
 the New South Africa," South African Journal of Geography, 82, 1 

 World Commission on Dams (2000), Dams and Development: A New
 Framework for Decision-Making, London, Earthscan (Executive Summary).

 Barlow, M. (1999), Blue Gold, Council of Canadians.

 Hall, D. (2001), The Public Sector Water Undertaking, PSIRU Report,
 London, Public Services International Research Unit.

***

SESSION 8: Wednesday, July 11, AM

REGIONAL CASE-STUDIES: EAST ASIA AND SOUTHERN AFRICA

REQUIRED READINGS

 Greenfield, G. (2000), "Organising, Protest and Workers'
 Self-Activity: Reflections from East Asia," in Leo Panitch and Colin
 Leys (Eds), The Global Working Class at the Millennium: Socialist
 Register 2001, London, Merlin and New York, Monthly Review Press.

 Bond, P., D.Miller and G.Ruiters (2000), "The Southern African
 Working Class: Production, Reproduction and Politics" in L.Panitch
 and C.Leys (Eds), The Global Working Class at the Millennium:
 Socialist Register 2001, London, Merlin and New York, Monthly Review
 Press. 

RECOMMENDED READINGS

 PSSP Review (2000), "Issues About the Struggles against
 Neoliberalism," Seoul, People's Solidarity for Social Progress; Chae,
 E., "For the Better Understanding of "Anti-Globalization'"
 (pp.11-20); Lee, C., "People's Responses to the WTO, Exclusion or
 Inclusion?" (pp.21-25).

 Burkett, P. and M.Hart-Landsberg (2000), Development, Crisis and
 Class Struggle: Learning from Japan and East Asia, New York,
 St.Martin's Press; Chapter 14, Beyond TINA: Toward Worker-Community
 Centered Visions of Development (pp.189-213).

 John S. Saul (2001), "Cry for the Beloved Country: The Post-Apartheid
 Denouement," Monthly Review, 52, 8 (January)

***

SESSION 9: July 12, AM

THE STRUGGLE FROM BELOW, I
(MOVEMENT COMPONENTS)

REQUIRED READINGS

 Albert, M. (2001), "The Movements against Neoliberal Globalization
 from Seattle to Porto Alegre," Paper presented to Athens Conference,
 9/3 and "New Targets" (undated), http://www.zmag.org. 

 Panitch, L. (2000), "Reflections on Strategy for Labour," in
 L.Panitch and C.Leys (Eds), Working Classes, Global Realities:
 Socialist Register 2001, London, Merlin and New York, Monthly Review
 (pp.367-392).

 Pollitt, K. (2001), "Women's rights: As the World Turns," from her
 Subject to Debate, Random House, New York, 

RECOMMENDED READINGS

 Warskett, R. (2000), "Feminism's Challenge to Unions in the North:
 Possibilities and Contradictions," in L.Panitch and C.Leys (Eds),
 Working Classes, Global Realities: Socialist Register 2001, London,
 Merlin and New York, Monthly Review (pp.329-342).

 Committee for Asian Women (2000), Dolls and Dust, Bangkok, Wayang;
 Chapter Five: "Globalisation & Gender Division of Labour"
 (pp.125-147).

 Anarchist website information (e.g., http://www.infoshop.org).

 O'Connor, J. (2000), "House Organ," Capitalism Nature Socialism, 11/4

 Rees, J. (2001), "Anti-capitalism, Globalisation, Socialism,"
 International Socialism, 90.

***

SESSION 10: July 13, AM

THE STRUGGLE FROM BELOW, II
(INTELLECTUAL, CULTURAL AND MOVEMENT-BUILDING CHALLENGES)

REQUIRED READINGS

 Klein, N. (2000), No Logo, London, Flamingo; Chapter 14, "Bad Mood
 Rising" (pp.325-343) and "Farewell to "the end of history":
 organization and vision in anti-corporate movements" (to be published
 in Socialist Register 2002 [in press])

 Brecher, J., T.Costello and B.Smith (2000), Globalization from Below:
 The Power of Solidarity, Boston, South End Press, Chapters 2-9.

RECOMMENDED READINGS

 Amin, S. (1997), Capitalism in the Age of Globalization: The
 Management of Contemporary Society, London, Zed; Chapter 7, "Ideology
 and Social Thought: The Intelligentsia and the Development Crisis" 

 Benjamin, M. (2000), "The Debate over Tactics," in K.Danaher and
 R.Burbach (Eds), Globalize This!, Monroe, Common Courage (pp.67-72).

 Bond, P. (2001), Against Global Apartheid: South Africa meets the
 World Bank, IMF and International Finance, London, Pluto and Cape
 Town, UCT Press; Chapter 11, "The Fix it or Nix it Debate"; Chapter
 12, "The Third World in the Movement for Global Justice."

 Socialist Register debate on Chiapas and solidarity, with articles by
 Judith Hellman ("Real and Virtual Chiapas: Magic Realism and the
 Left"), Justin Paulson, Judith Hellman (rebuttal) and Harry Cleaver
 (available under Hellman's name at the reserve desk in the library).

***

FINALLY, PLEASE TAKE SPECIAL NOTE:

SPECIAL WORKSHOP/CONFERENCE: Saturday, July 14, 9 AM-6 PM

Open to the public, and to be held on the University of Toronto campus
(full details to follow), this workshop/conference will feature
Patrick Bond and a range of other speakers and will develop further
the themes of our course. Students will be expected to participate
fully in the deliberations of the conference as a part of their
involvement in this course.

Patrick Bond (pbond at wn.apc.org)
home: 51 Somerset Road, Kensington 2094 South Africa
phone:  (2711) 614-8088
work:  University of the Witwatersrand
Graduate School of Public and Development Management
PO Box 601, Wits 2050, South Africa
work email:  bond.p at pdm.wits.ac.za
work phone:  (2711) 717-3917
work fax:  (2711) 484-2729
cellphone:  (27) 83-633-5548
* Municipal Services Project website -- http://www.queensu.ca/msp



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