Re British SWP and SSP

Peter Boyle peterb at dsp.org.au
Tue Dec 10 16:35:13 MST 2002


The obvious winds for left disunity may blow all the way
from Scotland, England and Wales to the antipodes but I hope
note. The overwhelming majority sentiment within the
Socialist Alliance in Australia -- as far as DSP comrades
can judge -- is to continue the positive trajectory towards
greater left unity. Certainly among Socialist Alliance
members who don't belong to one of the left groups
affiliated to the Alliance, and particularly among the trade
union militant layers, the sentiment is strongly for unity.
The article below by Raul Bassi expresses this sentiment.
Raul was a member of the PST in Argentina some
twenty-something years ago. He works as a courier-driver in
Sydney and was inspired to resume left activism by the
formation of the Socialist Alliance.

DSP members were concerned that developments in Britain may
push the International Socialist Organisation to leave the
Alliance but the ISO national conference in Sydney last
weekend decided to remain in the Socialist Alliance. But
from what we have been told by ISO members, it was a very
acrimonious and divided conference. On the question of
staying in the Socialist Alliance the delegates were evenly
divided and deferred voting on a perspectives resolution on
Socialist Alliance to a national committee meeting after the
NSW state elections in March 2003.

Peter Boyle
peterb at dsp.org.au

Time to unite for a strong Socialist Alliance
BY RAUL BASSI

I am thrilled about the level of discussion on left unity. I
have never before seen such a large number of contributions
to such a discussion. I come from an old tradition of
activism, politics and trade unionism. The best I can do is
try to pass on some experiences learned in those years.

For some of those years I lived in Argentina where the
political conditions and history are very different from
here. But looking at the situation in Argentina now, it
seems that Argentinian militants didn't learn from their
past experiences, when there was a high level of mass
mobilisation.

The organisations of the revolutionary left in Argentina
were always trying to differentiate themselves from each
other, sometimes nitpicking over small differences. This was
even true of the organisation that I belonged to and
defended. This nitpicking over differences didn't help the
mass struggles.

Now in Argentina, more or less the same organisations are
repeating the same mistakes of the past. With the capitalist
system and the political institutions in absolute crisis,
the left groups have focused on their differences rather
than seeking to unite the left groups and put forward a
socialist solution to the crisis. This has allowed the
capitalist parties to continue to rule, and the capitalist
system to limp along in Argentina.

Full article at:
<http://www.greenleft.org.au/current/520p13.htm>

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