The ideological implications of Scorcese's latest film

M. Adams galture at yahoo.co.uk
Fri Dec 20 11:12:59 MST 2002


> Alas, Martin Scorsese is not much of a social
> critic. He is fascinated
> by the outsider figure, whether it is the homocidal
> Travis Bickle in
> "Taxi Driver", raging bull Jake LaMotta or mafia
> criminal Henry Hill in
> "Goodfellas". Although I have not seen "Gangs of New
> York", which has
> not even opened in NYC, I assume that it will be
> standard Scorsese fare:
> brutal men in a Hobbesian universe. I will be
> particularly interested to
> see how he handles the Irish draft riots.
>
No major disagreement about Scorsese - his films are
quite a way down the list of places I'd look for
social commentary. I still can't help thinking that
having that song as a soundtrack is quite a good touch
though. The lyrics of the song are so trite and
sentimental along the standard lines of huddled masses
who made a great nation, that if the movie is usual
Scorsese fare there will be quite a contrast.

Either way though, the movie will probably be worth a
look. I'd be inclined to do a bit of reading about the
period first though.

=====
Mark Adams

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