Forwarded from Nestor (morphing)

Tom O'Lincoln suarsos at alphalink.com.au
Tue Aug 5 00:11:34 MDT 2003


Einde

We’re not far apart, but for what its worth, a few responses:

>>even in Germany the designation Marxist was never a swearword as in the
US. West Germany even produced a commemorative stamp for 150th anniversary
of Marx's birth 

I remember the stamp. But that was in 1968. Even in America, Marxist had
stopped being a dirty word by then. But the real dirty word was Communism,
and it was pretty dirty in Germany (not just in the west, either).

>>at least a section of the radicalised students and *youth* movement was
made up of young people of working class origin<<

True in the US as well, especially among non-whites.

>>Even in Germany of the 1950s and 1960s a figure like Willi Brandt, who
had started off as a militant of the Marxist Sozialistische Arbeiterpartei
(SAP) in the anti-nazi underground

But what was he in the fifties, that’s the question? The quintessential
anti-Communist hero. We heard all about him in America.

>>Communists amy have kept their heads down, but people who identified
themselves with communism were often elected as the equivalent of shop
stewards.<<

This happened in America too. The most obvious examples would have been in
a union like the Longshoremen (ILWU) where a CP fellow traveller named
Harry Bridges was in charge, but presumably also the electrical union UE.
In California, there was even Communist influence in the Teamsters. Which
was a pity in some ways, since the CP lined up with the Teamsters against
Cesar Chavez’s farm workers.






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