Subject: RE: Camejo, elections, independent politics

Gilles d'Aymery aymery at ix.netcom.com
Fri Jul 11 16:13:03 MDT 2003


Adam,

Can we agree that a scooter may not be *the* perfect vehicle yet be
*a* vehicle to bring out an alternative voice to the bicephalous system?

I am not suggesting that the GP is a "genuine movement" (I presume
you mean "revolutionary movement"). I am suggesting that at this time
it may be the only political coalition that Peter Camejo may use for a
campaign.

It seems to me that when one accepts the realities of electoral politics,
bringing people to the polls and having candidates elected do count.
My observation of the GP -- or at least the local parties I have
followed for the past couple of years, namely Santa Cruz, San
Francisco and Arcata in CA, and Somerville in MA where the Greens
merged with the Rainbow coalition -- is that they have emphasized,
organized and been active in local politics. While left unreported by
the media, they have actually increased their ranks.

And they are still reeling from the accusation that Gore lost because of
Nader.

Of course there are "white, petty-bourgeois, liberal" people aplenty in
the GP. That I know, the last time I looked there were quite a few
"white, petty-bourgeois, liberal" people in America...and not many
revolutionaries.

My submission to you is that this is the deck of cards we've been
dealt with. The question then is whether we play the game or not? If
we play, say if Peter Camejo runs, should he run as a green or say as
a WWP candidate (I am taking the WWP as an example and only
that). What venue would be the most helpful?

I'm coming from the perspective that the most common reactions I
hear in the boonies where I live (Bay Area) is that people, adamant to
beat Bush, do not want a third party candidate to run -- and these
people who call themselves "progressives" have quite specifically the
GP in mind and send money to Kucinich, the darling of the "cultural
Creatives!"

Well Kucinich will be out in March 04 and it will be business as usual.
IMO, Camejo and the GP are a good fit *at the present time* and
beat any other alternative that I can think of (e.g. Nader).

I for one would like to hear an alternative voice; keeping in mind that
perfection is the enemy of the good... Do you see another alternative?

Best,
Gilles d'Aymery


--- Gilles d'Aymery <aymery at ix.netcom.com> wrote:
> [Gilles]
> Adam, here are some stats in regard to the GP (from an article I
> wrote on Nov. 18, 2002 for Swans):

<snip quotes on what the GP has done in elections>

None of which answers:

>> I ask you again--what has the Party done between elections? You
>> have to admit that the answer lies somewhere between jack and
>> diddly squat.

Genuine movements--as opposed to "just parties"--are not measured
in what they've done in elections, but what happens *between*
elections.

What is the nature of the GP's non-election activity? Nothing.

[Gilles]
Adam, I've seen them organize locally quite a bit -- for instance in
Santa Cruz, SF and Arcata (in CA), or in Somerville, MA where the
Greens merged with the Rainbow coalition.

Do you know how you become a Green Party candidate? Jose and I
witnessed this process at the last Annual Meeting of the local Party a
few months ago. You become an Official Green Party Candidate by
saying that you want to run. (For the higher-profile offices, like
governor or President, there is an approval process through the
state/national leadership.)

You can be a Green Party candidate without being involved in the
party at all. Hell, Nader's not even a member. The Party itself barely
exists. Any success GP candidates have had is because of the
campaigns they run, *not* because of the Party.

> The GP may not be the perfect vehicle but it seems that at this time
> it's the only vehicle that has *some* viability if one wants to break >
ranks with the bicephalous system.

I don't think it *is* a vehicle--it's more of a scooter.

To become the type of party Jose is talking about--a party of the
working class--it would require changing the entire nature of the GP.
Maybe Peter can facilitate that change, but I'm not holding my breath.

I don't disagree with the idea that we should be working with GP
campaigns as a break with the Republicrat party, but let's not fool
ourselves into thinking that the Greens are some dynamic movement
that have the ability to transform into some revolutionary militant
organization. They're not, and they don't. We can look at Camejo's
campaign until the cows come home, but let's be honest with
ourselves--the Party itself is a white, petty-bourgeois, liberal
organization. And unless Peter can somehow, magically, take the
reigns of the organization and reinvent it, I don't think the Greens will
ever become anything else.

Adam



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