Fans not buying Chicks' apology

Walter Lippmann walterlx at earthlink.net
Wed Mar 19 06:16:23 MST 2003


(This is such a big issue that
anti-war organizers might
consider leafletting at their
concerts. No need to speak
about the controversy, just
go there and leaflet about
upcoming protests...)
=======================

POP MUSIC
Fans not buying Chicks' apology

The country trio's hit is sliding down the charts as more
radio stations, many in military towns, are dropping the
band from their playlists.

By Geoff Boucher
Los Angeles Times Staff Writer

March 19 2003

An apology to President Bush hasn't been enough to quiet the
squawk started by the Dixie Chicks. More country radio
stations, many of them in military towns, have cut the
country trio from their playlists and Cumulus Media Inc.,
one of the nation's largest radio chains, on Tuesday
continued a blackout of the group at their country outlets.
=====================
"On Monday we saw some stations in military towns, such as
Charleston [S.C.] pull the music of the Dixie Chicks after
polling their listeners over the weekend," said Angela King,
associate country editor of Radio & Records, the industry
journal. "The situation has not abated."
=====================
"No one has said that Natalie did not have the right to
express her opinion, but people here agree that they have a
right not to want to listen to her too," Cruise said.
"People think she could not have picked a worse time or a
worse place to express that opinion.... I think her apology
did not ring true to a lot of people as well."
=====================
"I would not be surprised," Cruise said, "if they get booed
off the stage at that first show. I know here in Houston a
lot of people are planning to go [to the July show] in
military uniforms and will not be the most welcoming
audience."
=====================
Here in Los Angeles, country music leader KZLA-FM (93.9)
has a hit record in the Worley song but also still has room
for
the Chicks in their playlist. Tonya Campos, the station's
assistant program director, said the fans who turn their
dial to KZLA country want entertainment, not politics.

"People tune in to hear music and we're trying to keep the
whole political thing out of it," Campos said. "Natalie
expressed her opinion, but the last time we checked, the
music of the Dixie Chicks was not political. We just want to
play country music."
http://www.calendarlive.com/music/pop/cl-et-boucher19mar19.s
tory



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