[Marxism] HISTORICAL MATERIALISM 11.4 FINALLY OUT! PLEASE CIRCULATE

Sebastian Budgen sebastian at amadeobordiga.u-net.com
Thu Apr 22 08:15:28 MDT 2004


Historical Materialism: Research in Critical Marxist Theory

Announcing issue 11.4

***NEW ANNOUNCEMENT***

ALL SUBSCRIBERS TO HISTORICAL MATERIALISM CAN NOW HAVE ONLINE ACCESS TO 
ALL
BACKISSUES!

***REANNOUNCEMENT***

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SERIES!


Volume 11 Issue 4
____________________________________________________________

CONTENTS

Symposium: The American Worker

Articles

Alan Johnson
Editorial Introduction: The American Worker and the Absurd Truth about
Marxism
Karl Kautsky
The American Worker
Daniel Gaido
'The American Worker' and the Theory of Permanent Revolution: Karl 
Kautsky
on Werner Sombart's Why Is There No Socialism in the United States?
Paul Le Blanc
The Absence of Socialism in the United States: Contextualising Kautsky's
'American Worker'
Loren Goldner
On the Non-Formation of a Working-Class Political Party in the United
States, 1900-45
Stephen Resnick and Richard Wolff
Exploitation, Consumption, and the Uniqueness of US Capitalism
Noel Ignatiev
Whiteness and Class Struggle
Alan Johnson
Equalibertarian Marxism and the Politics of Social Movements
Peter Hudis
Workers as Reason: The Development of a New Relation of Worker and
Intellectual in American Marxist Humanism


Intervention

Christopher Phelps
Why Wouldn't Sidney Hook Permit the Republication of His Best Book?

Archive

Franz Mehring
Literary Review of Hermann Schlüter's, Die Anfänge der deutschen
Arbeiterbewegung in Amerika
Franz Mehring
Obituary of Friedrich Sorge

Film Review

Brian D. Palmer
The Hands That Built America: A Class-Politics Appreciation of Martin
Scorsese's The Gangs of New York

Reviews

Kim Moody
on Seymour Martin Lipset's & Gary Marks's It Didn't Happen Here: Why
Socialism Failed in the United States
Mary McGuire
on American Exceptionalism: US Working-Class Formation in an 
International
Context, Edited by Rick Halpern and Jonathan Morris and Andrew 
Strouthous's
US Labour and Political Action, 1918-24: A Comparison of Independent
Political Action in New York, Chicago, and Seattle
Bryan D. Palmer
on Peter Linebaugh's and Marcus Rediker's The Many-Headed Hydra: The 
Hidden
History of the Revolutionary Atlantic
Alan Wald
on Rachel Rubin's Jewish Gangsters of Modern Literature, Caren Irr's The
Suburb of Dissent: Cultural Politics in the United States and Canada 
During
the 1930s, Cary Nelson's Revolutionary Memory: Recovering the Poetry of 
the
American Left and Billy Ben Smith's Career of Proletarian Novelist and 
New
Yorker Short Story Writer Edward Newhouse
Gerald Friedman
on Janet Irons's Testing the New Deal: The General Textile Strike of 
1934 in
the American South
Graham Barnfield
on Andrew Hemingway's Artists on the Left: American Artists and the
Communist Movement, 1926-1956 and Paula Rabinowitz's Black & White & 
Noir:
America's Pulp Modernism
Robbie Lieberman
on Bryan K. Carman's A Race of Singers: Whitman's Working Class Hero 
from
Guthrie to Springsteen
Sharon Smith
on Nelson Lichtenstein's State of the Union: A Century of American Labor
Nelson Lichtenstein
A Rejoinder to Sharon Smith




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'Historical Materialism provides exactly what is needed today: a Marxist
antidote to postmodern and similar fashions. It is one of the few 
journals
in English actually turned towards the future - one of the few journals 
in
which a progressive theorist can publish without secretly feeling 
ashamed!'
Slavoj Zizek

--


Historical Materialism seeks to reappropriate and refine the classical
Marxist tradition for emancipatory purposes. It promotes a genuine and 
open
dialogue between individuals working in different traditions of Marxism 
and
encourages an interdisciplinary, international debate between 
researchers
and academics. Historical Materialism sees itself as encouraging a new
generation of Marxist writers and researchers. Future issues will focus 
on
Africa, fantasy, the visual arts, Empire, anticapitalism, film, 
dialectics,
the American working class, modes of production, sexuality and 
postcolonial
fascism.


Now published by Brill Academic Publishers


EDITORS:
SAM ASHMAN
PAUL BLACKLEDGE
MARK BOULD
SEBASTIAN BUDGEN
MATTHEW CAYGILL
ALEJANDRO COLÁS
ANGELA DIMITRAKAKI
JIM KINCAID
ESTHER LESLIE
MARTIN MCIVOR
CHINA MIÉVILLE
GONZALO POZO
PAUL REYNOLDS
ALFREDO SAAD-FILHO
GUIDO STAROSTA
GIUSEPPE TASSONE
CONTACT:

CORRESPONDING EDITORS:
VIVEK CHIBBER
ALAN JOHNSON
PETER THOMAS

ADVISORY BOARD:
AIJAZ AHMAD (New Delhi), GREG ALBO (Toronto), ROBERT ALBRITTON 
(Toronto),
ELMAR ALTVATER (Berlin), GIOVANNI ARRIGHI (Baltimore), CHRIS ARTHUR
(Brighton), JAIRUS BANAJI (Bombay), COLIN BARKER (Manchester), DANIEL
BENSAÏD (Paris), HENRY BERNSTEIN (London), PATRICK BOND (Johannesburg),
WERNER BONEFELD (York), ROBERT BRENNER (Los Angeles), SIMON BROMLEY 
(Open
University), MICHAEL BURAWOY (Berkeley), PAUL BURKETT (Terre Haute), 
PETER
BURNHAM (Warwick), TERRY BYRES (London), ALEX CALLINICOS (York), 
GUGLIELMO
CARCHEDI (Amsterdam), ALAN CARLING (Bradford), VIVEK CHIBBER (New York),
ANDREW CHITTY (Sussex),SIMON CLARKE (Warwick), DAVID COATES (Reynolda
Station), ANDREW COLLIER (Southampton), GEORGE COMNINEL (Toronto), MIKE
DAVIS (San Diego), RICHARD B. DAY (Toronto), MICHAEL DENNING (Yale), 
FRANK
DEPPE (Marburg), GÉRARD DUMÉNIL (Paris), TERRY EAGLETON (Manchester),
GREGORY ELLIOTT (Paris), BEN FINE (London), ROBERT FINE (Warwick), JOHN
BELLAMY FOSTER (Eugene), CARL FREEDMAN (Baton Rouge), ALAN FREEMAN 
(London),
NORMAN GERAS (Manchester), MARTHA GIMENEZ (Boulder), MAURICE GODELIER
(Paris), PETER GOWAN (London), IRFAN HABIB (Aligarh), JOHN HALDON
(Birmingham), DAVID HARVEY (New York), WOLFGANG-FRITZ HAUG (Berlin), 
COLIN
HAY (Birmingham), MICHAEL HEINRICH (Berlin), JOHN HOLLOWAY (Mexico 
City),
FREDRIC JAMESON (Duke), BOB JESSOP (Lancaster), BORIS KAGARLITSKY 
(Moscow),
GEOFFREY KAY (London), JOHN KELLY (London), RAY KIELY (London), STATHIS
KOUVELAKIS (Paris), MARK LAFFEY (London), DAVID LAIBMAN (New York), 
COSTAS
LAPAVITSAS (London), NEIL LARSEN (Davis), NEIL LAZARUS (Warwick), 
MICHAEL
LEBOWITZ (Vancouver), ANDREW LEVINE (Madison), DOMINIQUE LÉVY (Paris),
MARCEL VAN DER LINDEN (Amsterdam), PETER LINEBAUGH (Toledo), DOMENICO
LOSURDO (Urbino), MICHAEL LÖWY (Paris), JOE MCCARNEY (Brighton), JOHN
MCILROY (Liverpool), DAVID MCNALLY (Toronto), SCOTT MEIKLE (Glasgow), 
PETER
MEIKSINS (Cleveland), ISTVÁN MÉSZÁROS (Brighton), WARREN MONTAG (Los
Angeles), KIM MOODY (New York), FRED MOSELEY (Mount Holyoke), FRANCIS
MULHERN (Middlesex), PATRICK MURRAY (Omaha), BERTELL OLLMAN (New York), 
JOHN
O'NEILL (Lancaster),WILLIAM PIETZ (Los Angeles), KEES VAN DER PIJL 
(Sussex),
CHARLES POST (New York), MOISHE POSTONE (Chicago), HELMUT REICHELT 
(Bremen),
GEERT REUTEN(Amsterdam), JOHN ROBERTS (London), JUSTIN ROSENBERG 
(Sussex),
MARK RUPERT (Syracuse), SUMIT SARKAR (Delhi), SEAN SAYERS (Kent), THOMAS
SEKINE (Tokyo), ANWAR SHAIKH (New York), JENS SIEGELBERG (Hamburg), 
HAZEL
SMITH (Warwick), NEIL SMITH (New York), TONY SMITH (Iowa), HILLEL 
TICKTIN
(Glasgow), ANDRÉ TOSEL (Nice), ENZO TRAVERSO (Paris), LISE VOGEL
(Lawrenceville), ALAN WALD (Ann Arbor), RICHARD WALKER (Berkeley), JOHN
WEEKS (London), CHRIS WICKHAM (Birmingham), MICHAEL WILLIAMS (Milton
Keynes), ELLEN MEIKSINS WOOD (London), ERIK OLIN WRIGHT (Madison)


Details
o Volume 10 (2002, 4 issues per year)
o ISSN 1465-4466
o List price Institutions EUR 149.- / US$ 173.-
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Why Historical Materialism now?
It is fourteen years since the implosion of 'historical communism' and 
the
triumphal proclamation of capitalism as the natural terminus of world
history. As neo-liberal strategies continue their work of global
accumulation and exploitation, the invincibility of the world market has
been assumed by all sides of the political spectrum. But while this new
global order is thus marked by an unprecedented unity of appearance, in
reality sharp differences and deepening inequalities persist, both 
between
states and within societies. For the world today is increasingly driven 
by
the political, economic and social contradictions which capitalist
development brings in its wake. To those on the margins of the world
economy, the effects of being left out are devastating: poverty, 
starvation
and civil war are widespread. Meanwhile in the advanced countries, the
pursuit of global competition for investment and the related internal
restructuring of the state have discredited even moderate Keynesian 
policies
and social reformism. Thus, despite the production of ever greater 
surplus
wealth, the numbers of those in poverty keep growing; and the vast 
majority
remain excluded from any meaningful power. And yet against this 
backdrop,
capitalism itself has been absolved of responsibility, and there has 
been a
retreat from any fundamental critique. One of the most effective 
arguments
in the hands of political and economic elates in enforcing domestically
unpopular policies is that international, 'globalising' capitalism has
become our 'fate' in a qualitatively new sense. It is this disabling 
eclipse
of social imagination, manifested in the almost universal assumption of 
a
continuing capitalist future that Historical Materialism seeks to 
counter.

Theoretical orientation Motivated by a vision of society free of
exploitation and domination, the journal sets out from the conviction 
that
classical Marxism provides the richest framework for analysing the 
making
and unmaking of social phenomena. Its aim is to build upon that 
tradition,
drawing on and debating the diverse contributions of its various 
strands. We
believe that the explanatory power of classical Marxism derives above 
all
from two key elements. The first of these elements is the epistemology 
of
the Theses on Feuerbach, especially its unity of theory and practice. 
Marx
famously said that 'philosophers have only interpreted the world, the 
point
is to change it'. In other words, the most incisive interpretations of 
the
world are those which are harnessed to practical efforts to transform 
it.
The second key element is Marxism's recognition of the centrality of 
class
relations and social struggle which result from historically specific 
modes
of surplus appropriation and domination. The key to understanding 
history
lies in relating the systemic forces inherent in capitalist and other 
class
societies, with the experiences of their agents. From this dialectical
antagonism of subject and object arises historical change. Aware of the
deformations and instrumentalisations of Marxism, we believe that Marx's
dictum in the Eighteenth Brumaire that 'the tradition of all the dead
generations weighs like a nightmare on the brains of the living' must be
critically applied to Marxism itself as an intellectual and political
tradition. Far from being a theoretical monolith, Marxism is 
necessarily an
object of continuing debate, a debate fuelled by the ever-changing
subjective experiences of people in differing social contexts, and
contingent on the objective logic of production and reproduction as 
embedded
in specific social relations. We propose that the regeneration of 
classical
Marxism requires the recovery of human agency, understood both in its
objectified existence which reproduces dominant social relations, and 
in its
disruptive, and potentially emancipator forms.

Working principles
The journal maintains two fundamental working principles:

Interdisciplinarity When the study of natural and social life is 
fragmented
into discrete disciplines, the potential for comprehending the shape of 
the
whole is weakened. This modern division of intellectual labour arose 
with
the emergence of capitalism and its concomitant differentiation of 
society.
Society is not, however, composed of different spheres of action, 
separately
pursuing their own self-reproductive logics. Rather, one relation 
dominates
and takes an exploitative form in class societies - that 'twofold 
relation'
through which people organise their collective interaction with the 
natural
world in order to transform it according to their needs: the relation of
production. The historically specific forms of this relation affect all
dimensions of social life, which have in the modern period become
differentiated in new ways. The task must be to take self-reflexive 
account
of these historical differentiations without naturalising and reifying 
their
separation and content. It is therefore necessary to continue the 
critique
of ideology and oppose the compartmentalisation of knowledge. Historical
Materialism will encourage the systematic integration and
cross-fertilisation of various fields of knowledge in concrete analyses.

Marxist pluralism Historical Materialism will seek to create a forum for
debate between those working in different Marxist traditions. The 
journal
will also engage with non-Marxist contributions which constructively
criticise Marxist theorems and attempt alternative explanations of 
social
phenomena. The journal is not aligned with any particular tendency or 
party
and aims to ensure that political differences are neither simply 
repressed
nor asserted a priori, but can emerge as a result of substantive 
theoretical
enquiry.

'The birth of Historical Materialism was a major event not only because 
it
provides a unique forum for non-sectarian Marxist debate but also 
because it
represents a change in the wind - a really promising sign of socialist
renewal.'
- Ellen Meiksins Wood

'Historical Materialism provides exactly what is needed today: a Marxist
antidote to postmodern and similar fashions. It is one of the few 
journals
in English actually turned towards the future - one of the few journals 
in
which a progressive theorist can publish without secretly feeling 
ashamed!'
- Slavoj Zizek

'Historical Materialism is already among the most highly regarded 
journals
in Marxian theory published in any language. In an age of increasing
specialization it is committed to high quality articles from across a 
broad
range of disciplines. If a resurgence of Marxian thinking occurs in the
twenty-first century Historical Materialism will deserve a good part of 
the
credit.'
- Tony Smith


Research agenda
The journal encourages research into four broad and, we stress,
non-exclusive areas. Firstly, at the very heart of the Marxist 
tradition is
the theorisation of history, class struggle and revolution. Within the 
wider
ambit of the Marxist theory of social change, we invite contributions 
of a
historical and theoretical nature which investigate the nexus between 
class
conflict, and social and political movements. Furthermore we encourage
studies which address Marxist conceptualisations of revolution. 
Secondly,
the development of historical materialism involves an attempt to fathom 
and
revitalise the elements which remain fundamental in the Marxist 
tradition.
We therefore welcome studies which survey recent attempts to 
re-appropriate
and redefine Marxism for contemporary social science. Areas which could 
be
covered within this context include: the clarification of core concepts 
and
theorems such as work on variations in Marxist method and epistemology, 
as
well as studies on the history and historiography of Marxism itself. The
third area of study is provided by the uneven and contradictory
universalisation of capitalism, and its international political economy.
Here we envisage debate on the geographical expansion of capitalism, its
incorporation of other social structures, and the politics of 
resistance to
these processes. We invite work on the historical relationship between 
the
state and the economy, and that between fragmented political authority 
and
the world market. The complexity of the historical genesis of capitalist
modernity requires that the arguably neglected themes of 
war/geopolitics,
diplomacy, trade, migration, strategies of exploitation, conjunctures of
crisis, questions of globalisation, and the latest round of neoliberal
orthodoxy must be within the scope of Marxist scholarship. Furthermore, 
we
welcome single country or area studies which combine the explanation of
conjunctural contexts within the perspective of long-term economic, 
social
and political developments. In the fourth area we aim to confront the
challenges of post-Marxist critique, the claim that the allegedly 
totalising
and class-reductionist premises of Marxism hinder comprehension of 
important
questions concerning gender, racism, ecology, culture and aesthetics. We
recognise the need for constructive engagement with these issues and
encourage studies into their historical constitution, and their 
relation to
the reproduction of capitalist society as a whole. Space will also be
provided for the critical exploration and development of the classical
themes of ideology and consciousness in which discussion of the above 
issues
were prefigured.

Editorial policy
Historical Materialism aims to be neither a traditional academic journal
locked into the career structure of a particular discipline, nor a 
platform
for the exhibition of a particular 'line' on the intellectual Left by 
the
already established. We welcome submission of work by graduate students 
and
younger researchers. The journal also intends to maintain a broad
international awareness and will actively encourage contributions from a
non-anglophone public. These could take the form of introducing
country-specific Marxist debates and issues to a primarily 
English-speaking
readership, or the presentation or discussion of major new or as yet
untranslated publications. Operating from these principles, the journal
hopes to display the ongoing power and commitment of historical
materialism - both as a method of analysis capable of providing 
explanation
adequate to the world we inhabit, and as an inspiration to human 
potential
and practical action.


'Historical Materialism demonstrates that Marxist analysis is not merely
alive, but thriving again as the contradictions of globalisation 
generate
economic, social and cultural tensions which mainstream analysis cannot
account for.'
- John Weeks

'Historical Materialism is an excellent journal providing a unique 
forum for
serious intellectual work about every aspect of Marxism. The quality of 
the
first issues surpassed expectations. The journal is essential reading 
for
anyone with an interest in this field.'
- Sean Sayers


Back issues

Volume No.1, Winter 1997: Ellen Meiksins Wood on the non-history of
capitalism o Colin Barker on Ellen Wood o Esther Leslie on Benjamin's
Arcades Project o John Weeks on underdevelopment o Tony Smith on 
theories of
technology o Michael Lebowitz on the silences of capital o John 
Holloway on
alienation o Peter Burnham on globalisation and the state o Fred 
Moseley on
the US rate of profit, plus reviews by Peter Linebaugh, Matthew 
Beaumont and
Benno Teschke

Volume No. 2, Summer 1998: China Miéville on architecture o Gregory 
Elliott
on Perry Anderson o Andrew Chitty on recognition o Michael Neary & 
Graham
Taylor on alchemy o Paul Burkett on neo-Malthusian Marxism o Slavoj 
Zizek on
risk society, plus reviews by Ben Watson, Mike Haynes, Esther Leslie, 
Elmar
Altvater, Martin Jenkins, Geoffrey Kay and Henning Teschke

Volume No. 3, Winter 1998: Symposium on Leninism and Political 
Organisation:
Simon Clarke o Howard Chodos &Colin Hay o John Molyneux o John 
Ehrenberg o
Alan Shandro o Jonathan Joseph o Peter Hudis o Plus Paul Burkett on Ted
Benton o Werner Bonefeld on novelty o John Robertson head-wounds, plus
reviews by Michael A. Lebowitz, Adrian Budd, Giles Peaker, Gareth Dale,
Kenneth J. Hammond and Christopher Bertram

Volume No. 4, Summer 1999: Symposium on Robert Brenner and the World 
Crisis,
Part 1 Alex Callinicos o Guglielmo Carchedi o Simon Clarke o Gérard 
Duménil
and Dominique Lévy o Chris Harman o David Laibman o Michael A. Lebowitz 
o
Fred Moseley o Murray Smith o Ellen Meiksins Wood o Plus Alan Johnson 
on Hal
Draper o Hal Draper on Lenin o Tony Smith on John Rosenthal, plus 
reviews by
Mathew Worley, Edwin Roberts, Charles Post, Alan Wald, Rick Kuhn and 
Emma
Bircham

Volume No. 5, Winter 1999: Symposium on Robert Brenner and the World 
Crisis,
Part 2 Werner Bonefeld o Alan Freeman o Michael Husson o Anwar Shaikh o 
Tony
Smith o Richard Walker o John Weeks o Plus Craig Brandist on ethics,
politics and dialogism o Geoff Kay on abstract labour and capital o plus
reviews by Sean Sayers, Jon Gubbay, Gregor Gall, Alan Johnson, Greg 
Dawes
and Adrian Haddock

Volume No. 6, Summer 2000: Alan Shandro on Marx as a conservative 
thinker o
Patrick Murray on abstract labour o Deborah Cook on Adorno and Habermas 
o
Andrew Kliman on intrinsic value o Felton Shortall vs. Michael Lebowitz 
on
the limits of capital o Ben Fine, Costas Lapavitsas & Dimitris 
Milonakis vs.
Tony Smith on Brenner o plus reviews by Michael Cowen, Alan Carling & 
Paul
Nolan, Jonathan Joseph and Ian Birchall

Volume No. 7, Winter 2000: Tony Burns on ancient Greek materialism o 
Chik
Collins on Vygotsky and Voloshinov o Paul Wetherly on Giddens o Patrick
Murray on abstract labour, part II o Geert Reuten on Patrick Murray o 
John
Kelly vs. Gregor Gall on class mobilisation o An interview with Slavoj 
Zizek
o plus reviews by Noel Castree, Paul Blackledge, Paul Jaskot, John 
Roberts,
Andrew Hemingway and Larry Wilde

Volume No. 8, Summer 2001: Focus on East Asia: Paul Burkett & Martin
Hart-Landsberg on East Asia since the financial crisis o Michael Burke 
on
the changing nature of capitalism o Giles Ungpakorn on Thailand o Vedi 
Hadiz
on Indonesia o Dae-oup Chang on South Korea o Raymond Lau on China o Jim
Kincaid on Marxist explanations of the Crisis o Dic Lo on China o 
Joseph T.
Miller in Peng Shuzhi o Paul Zarembka & Sean Sayers debate Marx and
Romanticism o Ted Benton & Paul Burkett debate Marx and ecology o 
Reviews by
Walden Bello, Alex Callinicos, Paul Burkett, Brett Clark and John 
Bellamy
Foster.

Volume No. 9, Winter 2001: Peter Gowan, Leo Panitch & Martin Shaw on the
state and globalisation: a roundtable discussion o Andrew Smith on 
occult
capitalism o Susanne Soederberg on capital accumulation in Mexico o 
David
Laibman on the contours of the maturing socialistic economy o John 
Rosenthal
on Hegel Decoder: A Reply to Smith's 'Reply' o Jonathan Hughes on 
Analytical
Marxism and Ecology: A Reply to Paul Burkett o Reviews by Alex 
Callinicos,
Warren Montag, Kevin Anderson and Tony Smith.

Volume 10, Number 1: Articles o Ellen Meiksins Wood on Infinite War o 
Peter
Green on 'The Passage from Imperialism to Empire': A Commentary on 
Empire by
Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri o John Holloway on Going in the Wrong
Direction: Or, Mephistopheles - Not Saint Francis of Assisi o Ray Kiely 
on
Actually Existing Globalisation, De-Globalisation, and the Political 
Economy
of Anticapitalist Protest o Enzo Traverso on Bohemia, Exile and 
Revolution o
Interventions o Patrick Murray's Reply to Geert Reuten o Paul Burkett on
Analytical Marxism and Ecology: A Rejoinder o Reviews o Erik Olin 
Wright and
Harry Brighouse on Alex Callinicos's Equality o Paresh Chattopadhyay on
Bertell Ollman's Market Socialism: The Debate among Socialists and 
Michael
Howard's Self-Management and the Crisis of Socialism o Chris Arthur on
Robert Albritton's Dialectics and Deconstruction in Political Economy o 
John
Foster on Neil Davidson's The Origins of Scottish Nationhood o Alex Law 
on
William Kenefick and Arthur McIvor's Roots of Red Clydeside 1910-1914? o
Thomas M. Jeannot on John O'Neill's The Market: Ethics, Knowledge, and
Politics o Richard Saull on Fred Halliday's Revolution and World 
Politics:
The Rise and Fall of the Sixth Great Power

Volume 10, Number 2 o Commentary o Paris Yeros on Zimbabwe and the 
Dilemmas
of the Left o Articles o Sam Gindin and Leo Panitch on Gems and Baubles 
in
Empire o Marcus Taylor on Success for Whom? An Historical-Materialist
Critique of Neoliberalism in Chile o Sean Creaven on The Pulse of 
Freedom?
Bhaskar's Dialectic and Marxism o Paul Nolan Levine and Sober on Natural
Selection and Historical Materialism o Interventions o Jason C. Myers on
Ideology After the Welfare State o Tony Smith on Hegel: Mystic Dunce or
Important Predecessor? A Reply to John Rosenthal o Robert Albritton on A
Response to Chris Arthur o Film Review o Mike Wayne on A Violent Peace:
Robert Guédiguian's La Ville est tranquille o Reviews o Milton Fisk on
Markar Melkonian's Richard Rorty's Politics: Liberalism at the End of 
the
American Century o Ian Birchall on Jean-Pierre Le Goff's Mai 68, 
l'héritage
impossible and Gérard Filoche's 68-98, Histoire sans fin o Dave Beech on
Arthur C. Danto's The Wake of Art: Criticism, Philosophy, and the End of
Taste o Gregor Gall on Peter Waterman's New Internationalisms and Labour
Worldwide in an Era of Globalization: Alternative Union Models in the 
New
World Order, edited by Ronaldo Munck and Peter Waterman


Volume 10, Number 3 o Articles o Giovanni Arrighi on Lineages of Empire 
o
Ellen Wood on Landlords and Peasants, Masters and Slaves: Class 
Relations in
Greek and Roman Antiquity o Peter Thomas on Philosophical Strategies:
Althusser and Spinoza o Archive o Richard B. Day on Pavel V. 
Maksakovsky:
The Marxist Theory of the Cycle o Pavel V. Maksakovsky on The General 
Theory
of the Cycle o Intervention o Neil Davidson on Stalinism, 'Nation 
Theory'
and Scottish History: A Reply to John Foster o Reviews o Ian Buchanan on
Perry Anderson's The Origins of Postmodernity, Clint Burnham's The
Jamesonian Unconscious, Steven Helmling's The Success and Failure of 
Fredric
Jameson, Sean Homer's Fredric Jameson, Adam Roberts's Fredric Jameson, 
and
Christopher Wise's The Marxian Hermeneutics of Fredric Jameson o Simon
Bromley on Gregory Elliott's Perry Anderson: The Merciless Laboratory of
History o Ian H. Birchall on Bernard-Henri Lévy's Le Siècle de Sartre

Volume 10, Number 4 o A special symposium: MARXISM AND FANTASY o 
Articles o
Mark Bould on the Dreadful Credibility of Absurd Things: A Tendency in
Fantasy Theory o Stuart Elden on Through the Eyes of the Fantastic:
Lefebvre, Rabelais and Intellectual History o Ishay Landa on Slaves of 
the
Ring: Tolkien's Political Unconscious o Mike Wayne on Utopianism and 
Film o
Anna Kornbluh on For the Love of Money o Alex Law and Jan Law on Magical
Urbanism: Walter Benjamin and Utopian Realism in the Film Ratcatcher o 
Ben
Watson on Fantasy and Judgement: Adorno, Tolkien, Burroughs o Archive o
Ernest Mandel - Anticipation and Hope as Categories of Historical
Materialism o Interventions o Carl Freedman on A Note on Marxism and 
Fantasy
o Fredric Jameson on Radical Fantasy o Steve Shaviro on Capitalist 
Monsters
o Reviews o Neil Maycroft on Patrick Hamilton's Impromptu in Moribundia 
o
Mark Bould on Carl Freedman's Critical Theory and Science Fiction o 
Andrew
M. Butler on Rob Latham's Consuming Youth: Vampires, Cyborgs, and the
Culture of Consumption o Non-symposium items o Article o Ana Dinerstein 
on
The Battle of Buenos Aires: Crisis, Insurrection and the Reinvention of
Politics in Argentina o Reviews o Tony Smith on Werner Bonefeld and 
Kosmas
Psychopedis (eds.), The Politics of Change: Globalisation, Ideology and
Critique o Mike Haynes on Marxism and the Russian Question in the Wake 
of
the Soviet Collapse

Volume 11 Issue 1 o Commentary o ALFREDO SAAD-FILHO on New Dawn or False
Start in Brazil? The Political Economy of Lula's Election o Articles o 
MARIA
TURCHETTO on The Empire Strikes Back: On Hardt and Negri o GEORGE 
LIODAKIS
on The Role of Biotechnology in the Agro-food System and the Socialist
Horizon o PAUL PAOLUCCI on The Scientific Method and the Dialectical 
Method
o SEAN SAYERS o Creative Activity and Alienation in Hegel and Marx o
Interventions o MARTIN HART-LANDSBERG AND PAUL BURKETT on Development,
Crisis, and Class Struggle in East Asia: A Reply o DAN BOUSFIELD on
Export-Led Development and Imperialism: A Response to Burkett and
Hart-Landsberg o JIM KINCAID on Underconsumption versus the Rate of 
Profit:
a Reply to Burkett and Hart-Landsberg o CHRISTOPHER J. ARTHUR on The
Hegel-Marx Connection o TONY SMITH On the Homology Thesis o CHRISTOPHER 
J.
ARTHUR on Once More on the Homology Thesis: A Response to Smith's Reply 
o
Reviews o SCOTT MACWILLIAM on Mohammed A. Bayeh's The Ends of 
Globalization;
Terry Boswell's and Christopher Chase-Dunn's The Spiral of Capitalism 
and
Socialism; Raymond Vernon's In the Hurricane's Eye: The Troubled 
Prospects
of Multinational Enterprises; and Robert Went's Globalization: 
Neoliberal
Challenge, Radical Responses o IAN BIRCHALL on Philippe Riviale's L'
impatience du bonheur: apologie de Gracchus Babeuf; Alain Maillard's La
Communauté des égaux; and Jean Soublin's Je t'écris au sujet de Gracchus
Babeuf o PETE GLATTER on Elites after State Socialism: Theories and
Analysis, edited by John Higley and György Lengyel.

Volume 11 Issue 2 o Articles o TONY SMITH on Globalisation and 
Capitalist
Property Relations: A Critical Assessment of David Held's Cosmopolitan
Theory o PAUL CAMMACK on The Governance of Global Capitalism: A New
Materialist Perspective o WILLIAM BROWN on The Bank, Africa and 
Politics: A
Comment on Paul Cammack o SIMON PIRANI on Class Clashes with Party: 
Politics
in Moscow between the Civil War and the New Economic Policy o GLENN 
RIKOWSKI
on Alien Life: Marx and the Future of the Human o Interventions o JAMES
GORDON FINLAYSON on The Theory of Ideology and the Ideology of Theory?
Habermas Contra Adorno o DEBORAH COOK offers A Response to Finlayson o 
ALEX
CALLINICOS on Egalitarianism and Anticapitalism: A Reply to Harry 
Brighouse
and Erik Olin Wright o Reviews o ENZO TRAVERSO on Norman Finkelstein's 
The
Holocaust Industry. Reflections on the Exploitation of Jewish 
Suffering, and
Peter Novick's The Holocaust in American Life o CHIK COLLINS on David
McNally's Bodies of Meaning: Studies on Language, Labor and Liberation o
CRAIG BRANDIST on Galin Tihanov's The Master and the Slave: Lukács, 
Bakhtin
and the Ideas of their Time o CHRIS ARTHUR on Enrique Dussel's Towards 
an
Unknown Marx: A Commentary on the Manuscripts of 1861-3 o BOB JESSOP on
Fritz K. Ringer's Max Weber's Methodology: the Unification of the 
Cultural
and Social Sciences.

Volume 11, Issue 3 o Commentary o MARTA HARNECKER on Understanding the 
Past
to Make the Future: Reflections on Allende's Government o Articles o 
SIMON
BROMLEY on Reflections on 'Empire', Imperialism and United States 
Hegemony o
JAIRUS BANAJI on The Fictions of Free Labour: Contract, Coercion, and
So-Called Unfree Labour o ALAN MILCHMAN on Marxism and the Holocaust o 
An
Interview with MICHAEL HARDT o Interventions o ANGELA DIMITRAKAKI on 
Art and
Politics Continued: Avant-garde, Resistance and the Multitude in 
Documenta
II o ANDREW LEVINE and ELLIOTT SOBER Reply to Paul Nolan's 'What's 
Darwinian
About Historical Materialism? A Critique of Levine and Sober' o PAUL 
NOLAN
Rejoinders o Reviews o KEES VAN DER PIJL on Peter Gowan's The Global
Gamble - Washington's Faustian Bid for World Dominance and Bob Deacon's
Global Social Policy - International Organizations and the Future of 
Welfare
o COLIN MOOERS on Cultural Studies and Political Theory Edited by Jodi 
Dean
and Culture and Economy After the Cultural Turn, Edited by Larry Ray and
Andrew Sayer o RAY KIELY on Meghnad Desai's Marx's Revenge: The 
Resurgence
of Capitalism and the Death of Statist Socialism o IAN BIRCHALL on Susan
Weissman's Victor Serge: The Course Is Set on Hope o ALAN SHANDRO on 
Jeremy
Lester's Dialogue of Negation: Debates on Hegemony in Russia and the 
West o
PRANAV JANI on Mapping Subaltern Studies and the Postcolonial Edited by
Vinayak Chaturvedi



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