[Marxism] As the Soldier Dies, So Does the Nation Come Alive: The Sacrificial Meaning of Warfare

Library of Social Science libraryofsocialscience at earthlink.net
Mon Aug 23 14:32:49 MDT 2004


 <http://home.earthlink.net/~libraryofsocialscience/> CLICK HERE to read: AS
THE SOLDIER DIES, SO DOES THE NATION COME ALIVE: The Sacrificial Meaning of
Warfare.

Or go to:  <http://home.earthlink.net/~libraryofsocialscience/>
http://home.earthlink.net/~libraryofsocialscience/

Seemingly an activity, war in actuality represents the acting out of an
ideology. What is the nature of the idea that gives rise to war?

Contemporary thought focuses on discourse, as if passionate, violent forms
of action could be the result of disembodied structures of cognition. What
desires and anxieties give rise to and sustain the discourse of war?

In this paper--available for the first time as an on-line
publication--Richard Koenigsberg continues his exploration into the sources
of societal violence.

Phrases like "The individual must die so that the nation might live" suggest
that the country is a living creature, the preservation of which is more
valuable than the preservation of a human life. In war, human bodies are
sacrificed in the name of perpetuating the body politic. Entering into
battle is a devotional act; death in war the supreme act of devotion.

A French soldier in the First World War wrote to his parents and asked them
to remember him as one who had 'given their blood that France may live.'
Warfare resembles a blood transfusion--the life-sustaining substance of an
individual body passing into the collective body, functioning to keep it
alive.
  
 <http://home.earthlink.net/~libraryofsocialscience/> CLICK HERE to read: AS
THE SOLDIER DIES, SO DOES THE NATION COME ALIVE: The Sacrificial Meaning of
Warfare.

Or go to:  <http://home.earthlink.net/~libraryofsocialscience/>
http://home.earthlink.net/~libraryofsocialscience/

 




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