[Marxism] 93 Muslim figures from 30 countries back Iraq insurgency

Fred Feldman ffeldman at bellatlantic.net
Tue Aug 24 06:47:42 MDT 2004


The following items were submitted by Mark Jensen of United for Peace of
Pierce County (Seattle).  He also wrote the introductory note.
Fred Feldman



NEWS: 93 prominent Muslim figures from nearly 30 countries issue call to

support Iraqi insurgents

[Two versions of a rather mysterious piece that ABC News Online in
Australia 
attributed anonymously to Reuters,[1] but that the Glasgow *Herald*
published 
in a very slightly different, longer version under Cameron Simpson's
byline, 
without mentioning Reuters.[2]  It was also reprinted in greatly
truncated 
form by the *Australian Financial Review*, without attribution.  A
Google news 
search suggests that no U.S. news source has picked up the story as yet.
-Mark]

http://ufppc.org/index.php?option=content&task=view&id=1176

1.

SENIOR MUSLIM FIGURES BACK IRAQI INSURGENTS

Reuters
August 23, 2004

http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200408/s1182542.htm

Ninety-three prominent Muslim figures opposed to US troops in Iraq have
called 
on Muslims around the world to support resistance to US forces and to
the 
Iraqi government installed in June.

In the appeal received on Sunday from the offices of Egypt's Muslim 
Brotherhood, the Muslim figures from nearly 30 nations, from Germany to 
Indonesia, said the aim should be to "purify the land of Islam from the
filth 
of occupation."

The statement came as US tanks rumbled to within 800 metres of a holy
shrine 
in the Iraqi city of Najaf, after fierce clashes with Shiite rebels in a

nearby town reportedly killed at least 40 Iraqis.

Talks to end a near three-week Shiite Muslim uprising led by rebel
cleric 
Moqtada al-Sadr appeared to have stalled after negotiators failed to
agree on 
how to surrender control of the Imam Ali shrine, where Mehdi militias
remain 
holed up.

The signatories included senior members of the Brotherhood, leading 
Qatari-based moderate Youssef al-Qaradawi, Hezbollah leader Sheikh
Hassan 
Nasrallah of Lebanon, Khaled Mashal of the Palestinian group Hamas, two 
Egyptian opposition party leaders, Sheikh Abdeslam Yassine of Morocco's 
Justice and Charity Group and Yemeni Speaker of Parliament Sheikh
Abdullah 
al-Ahmar.

Others came from Afghanistan, Algeria, Bahrain, Bosnia, the Comoros,
Germany, 
India, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Libya, Malaysia, Mauritania, Pakistan, Saudi 
Arabia, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syria, Tajikistan and 
Tunisia.

The appeal said that Muslim rulers had been silent to the point of
complicity 
in the face of what it called Anglo-American and Zionist aggression in
Iraq 
and the Palestinian territories.

"(The signatories) call on our Arab and Muslim peoples and all religious

authorities and liberation forces everywhere to oppose the occupation
and 
savage crimes in Iraq and Palestine, by providing all kinds of material
and 
moral support to the honourable resistance . . . until God's victory
comes," 
it said.

The statement called the Iraqi government "subordinate and installed, a
mere 
shadow of the occupation, designed to impose hegemony on Iraq and its 
resources."

The signatories called for democracy throughout the Muslim world through
free 
and fair elections, with respect for pluralism and the dignity of
citizens.

2.

MUSLIMS URGED TO GET U.S. 'FILTH' OUT OF IRAQ
By Cameron Simpson

The Herald (Glasgow, Scotland, UK)
August 23, 2004

http://www.theherald.co.uk/news/22456.html

NEARLY 100 prominent Muslims yesterday called on followers around the
world to 
support resistance to American forces in Iraq and the government
installed in 
June.

In an appeal released by the offices of Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood, the
93 
figures from nearly 30 nations, from Germany to Indonesia, said the aim
should 
be to "purify the land of Islam from the filth of occupation".

The signatories included senior members of the brotherhood, Youssef al 
Qaradawi, a leading Qatari-based moderate; Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah of
Lebanon, 
Hizbollah leader; Khaled Mashal, of the Palestinian group Hamas; two
Egyptian 
opposition party leaders; Sheikh Abdeslam Yassine of Morocco's Justice
and 
Charity Group; and Sheikh Abdullah al Ahmar, Yemeni speaker of
parliament.

Others came from Afghanistan, Algeria, Bahrain, Bosnia, the Comoros,
Germany, 
India, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Libya, Malaysia, Mauritania, Pakistan, Saudi 
Arabia, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syria, Tajikistan, and 
Tunisia.

The appeal said Muslim rulers had been silent to the point of complicity
in 
the face of what it called British-American and Zionist aggression in
Iraq and 
the Palestinian territories.

"(The signatories) call on our Arab and Muslim peoples and all religious

authorities and liberation forces everywhere to oppose the occupation
and 
savage crimes in Iraq and Palestine, by providing all kinds of material
and 
moral support to the honourable resistance . . . until God's victory
comes," 
it said.

The statement called the Iraqi government "subordinate and installed, a
mere 
shadow of the occupation, designed to impose hegemony on Iraq and its 
resources".  The signatories called for democracy throughout the Muslim
world 
through free and fair elections, with respect the dignity of citizens.

The appeal was launched as US helicopter gunships pounded Shi'ite
militias in 
the holy Iraqi city of Najaf and tanks rumbled to within 800 yards of a
holy 
shrine at the centre of a near three-week insurgency.

With talks aimed at ending the siege of the Imam Ali mosque stalled, US
forces 
appeared to have tightened their noose around the old city, a stronghold
of 
rebels loyal to Moqtada al Sadr, the radical Shi'ite Muslim cleric.

Near Najaf, clashes between US troops and militias on Saturday killed 40

people in the town of Kufa, a Shi'ite bastion from where al Sadr has led

Friday prayers.  Interior Ministry officials said the dead were militias
and 
civilians.

Rounds of heavy-calibre fire from armoured vehicles rattled across the 
labyrinth of narrow streets that lead to the gold-domed mosque in Najaf,
where 
Mehdi militias remain holed up in defiance of a government demand to
leave and 
disband.

North of Baghdad, a suicide car bomb blew up near a convoy carrying
Iraqi 
officials near the restive town of Baquba, killing two people and
wounding 
eight.  The car bomber appeared to have been targeting Ghasan
al-Ghadren, the 
town's deputy mayor, police said. The official was slightly wounded, the

health ministry said.

In Karachi about 5000 Shi'ite Muslims held an anti-US rally to protest
at the 
fighting in Najaf and demand American forces withdraw from Iraq.

The rally was emotionally charged but peaceful.

Pakistan's government is a key ally in the US-led war on terrorism, but
the 
majority of the 150 million people in the Islamic nation opposed the
US-led 
invasion of Iraq.








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