[Marxism] Funeral set today for Benjamin Karim

Walter Lippmann walterlx at earthlink.net
Fri Aug 5 10:52:05 MDT 2005


>From Benjamin Karim's memoir
REMEMBERING MALCOLM, pp.111-112
Carroll & Graf Publishers 1992

"Malcolm's powers of persuasion did not entirely succeed
with Fidel Castro. In September 1960, when Castro came to
New York to speak at the United Nations, the press got word
from his midtown hotel that along with his entourage Castro
was traveling with live chickens, to be sure he'd have
untainted poultry, and evidently had had their necks wrung
hi his hotel room. Blood was splattered, and feathers were
strewn, everywhere, on the walls, carpet, bedspreads,
chairs. The press was having a field day. So Malcolm sent
word to Castro that he should move uptown to the Hotel
Theresa. An FOI brother, Luqman, who was working with the
Cubans on security at the hotel, was informed by a Cuban
official that Castro would like to meet with Malcolm.

"Luqman rushed down to the temple restaurant with Castro's
request, which I relayed to Malcolm. The three of us got
into Malcolm's dark blue Oldsmobile and drove up to the
Theresa on 125th Street, but only Malcolm went up to
Castro's room. After some while, when he came back down,
Malcolm said the meeting had been congenial, but he offered
no details. Later he revealed that he had tried to do a
little fishing that afternoon. He'd tried to get Castro
to become a Muslim, he said, and Castro hadn't said no. 
He hadn't said yes, either."
===========================================================

Funeral set today for Benjamin Karim
Minister, author who was Malcolm X's 
right-hand man died Tuesday at 73
BY LEA SETEGN
TIMES-DISPATCH STAFF WRITER
Friday, August 5, 2005

A funeral for Benjamin Goodman Karim, a minister and author
who was Malcolm X's right-hand man, will be held Friday at
2 p.m. at the Islamic Center of Virginia, 1241 Buford Road.

Burial will follow at Greenwood Memorial Gardens, 12609
Patterson Ave.

Mr. Karim, of Richmond, died Tuesday after a fall, said a
son, Zaid Karim of Richmond. He was 73.

In 1957, Mr. Karim was living the good life in New York
City: working for a recording company, wearing fashionable
clothes, conking his hair, trying to look hip.

All of that changed when he heard Malcolm X speak.

Curiosity about the charismatic Nation of Islam leader
prompted Mr. Karim to visit Temple No. 7 in Harlem, where
Malcolm X was the minister.

After hearing Malcolm X talk for more than two hours about
the history of slavery, Mr. Karim joined the Nation of
Islam, he wrote in 1971 in the introduction to "The End of
White World Supremacy," a collection of Malcolm X's
speeches.

Mr. Karim studied hard to meet Malcolm X's expectations, he
wrote. He cut his hair short and began dressing in the
sober suits that distinguished Malcolm X's followers. He
stopped cursing, drinking and eating pork.

Within six months, he became "Benjamin 2X," so named as the
second Benjamin in the organization to receive an "X." The
letter substituted for "the slave name given to our
forebearers . . . since we did not know what our rightful
names were," he wrote in 1971.

For the next seven years, Benjamin 2X worked closely with
Malcolm X, becoming a key aide and standing in for him at
events around the country. He also ran the temple's
education program.

"Benjamin was the quintessential right-hand man to Brother
Malcolm," said A. Peter Bailey, an author and journalist
who worked with Malcolm X in 1964 and 1965. "Benjamin had
like a quiet presence, but a presence that gave you a sense
of authority and of being in control."

In 1964, Malcolm X broke from the Nation of Islam and
founded the Organization for Afro-American Unity. Benjamin
2X remained with him.

On Feb. 21, 1965, Benjamin 2X introduced Malcolm X to a
crowd waiting to hear him speak at the Audubon Ballroom in
Harlem. Moments later, Malcolm X was assassinated.

After Malcolm X's death, Mr. Karim rejoined the Nation of
Islam and received "Karim" as his last name, his son Zaid
said. He traveled the country with his family as a Muslim
minister, arriving in Richmond in the late 1970s.

Mr. Karim worked to keep Malcolm X and his ideas alive,
speaking at universities around the country and writing
about their years together. In 1992, Mr. Karim published a
book, "Remembering Malcolm," that The Washington Post
called "a resplendent tribute" to Malcolm X.

Mr. Karim served as an adviser on Spike Lee's 1992 film,
"Malcolm X," his son said. He also worked on documentaries,
wrote articles and was writing another book at the time of
his death.

In February, on the 40th anniversary of Malcolm X's death,
Mr. Karim visited the Audubon Ballroom for the first time
since 1965. The theater is being turned into a history
center that will examine Malcolm X's legacy.

"I feel good about" the history center, Mr. Karim told The
Associated Press. "In the minds of his people, he has been
brought back to life."

In addition to his son, Mr. Karim's survivors include his
wife Linda; two more sons, Jamal Karim of Orlando, Fla.,
and Jahlil Karim of Richmond; two daughters, Asia Karim of
Chicago and Khadigia Karim of New York City; and 15
grandchildren. He was predeceased by a son, Tariq Karim.

This story can be found at:
<http://www.timesdispatch.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=RTD/MGArticle/RTD_B
asicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1031784266951>


Benjamin Karim, right-hand man to Malcolm X, dies
http://www.wvec.com/sharedcontent/APStories/stories/D8BPDR380.html
8/05/2005
Associated Press

Benjamin Goodman Karim, a minister, author and right-hand man to
Malcolm X during the civil rights movement and beyond, has died at
age 73.

Karim died Tuesday after a fall, son Zaid Karim told the Richmond
Times-Dispatch.

Karim's life changed in 1957 when curiosity about Malcolm X prompted
him to go listen to the charismatic Nation of Islam leader speak
about the history of slavery.

In an introduction he wrote to "The End of White World Supremacy" in
1971, Karim said he joined the Nation of Islam soon after hearing the
speech, beginning a lengthy association with Malcolm X that continued
even after he left the Nation of Islam.

Karim stood in for Malcolm X at some appearances, and introduced him
on Feb. 21, 1965 at the Audubon Ballroom in Harlem, moments before
Malcolm X was assassinated.

"Benjamin had like a quiet presence, but a presence that gave you a
sense of authority and of being in control," A. Peter Bailey, an
author and journalist who worked with Malcolm X in 1964 and 1965,
told the newspaper.

Karim rejoined the Nation of Islam after Malcolm X's death, and later
received "Karim" as his last name, his son said. Karim traveled the
country as a Muslim minister and spoke at universities and elsewhere
trying to keep Malcolm X's ideas alive.

He also wrote "Remembering Malcolm," a tribute, in 1992, and in
February visited the Audubon Ballroom for the first time in the 40
years since the assassination.

In addition to his son, Karim is survived by his wife Linda; sons
Jamal Karim of Orlando, Fla., and Jahlil Karim of Richmond; daughters
Asia Karim of Chicago and Khadigia Karim of New York City; and 15
grandchildren. He was predeceased by a son, Tariq Karim.

___

Information from: Richmond Times-Dispatch,
http://www.timesdispatch.com






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