[Marxism] Fw: [gangbox] Fwd: RACIAL BIAS IN NEW ORLEANS DISASTER COVERAGE....BLACKS ARE DESCRIBED AS ``LOOTERS``, BUT WHITES ARE SAID TO HAVE ``FOUND`` FOOD IN EMPTY STORES.....

Louis R Godena louisgodena at ids.net
Wed Aug 31 16:36:16 MDT 2005


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "The Infamous Vinnie Gangbox" <gangbox at excite.com>
Sent: Wednesday, August 31, 2005 5:52 PM
Subject: [gangbox] Fwd: RACIAL BIAS IN NEW ORLEANS DISASTER 
COVERAGE....BLACKS ARE DESCRIBED AS ``LOOTERS``, BUT WHITES ARE SAID TO HAVE 
``FOUND`` FOOD IN EMPTY STORES.....



 from DIVERSITYINC.COM:

 Media's Race Bias Shows in Hurricane Katrina Coverage
Compiled by the DiversityInc staff
© 2005 DiversityInc.com®
August 31, 2005


 Analysis of today's diversity news from Alternet.org, MSNBC.com, USA Today, 
The New York Times, The Village Voice and more:



 Are white people "finding" something to eat while black people are 
"looting" for lunch in New Orleans and other flooded areas?



 There were two different images-one shot by an AFP/Getty Images 
photographer and another from The Associated Press (AP)-and each had a 
different caption when published on Yahoo.com. In the AP photograph, the 
photo shows a black person with some food. The caption below the picture 
says he's just finished "looting" a grocery store. The other photo captured 
two white people with the caption describing how they were "finding" bread 
and soda from a grocery store, BoingBoing.Net reports. In both pictures, the 
subjects are swimming, holding food, with no stores in sight.



 The difference in words may be indicative of racial bias in the mainstream 
media. In a related commentary, Christina Pazzanese wrote in a Poynter.org 
forum a media-studies organization, that in the national "crisis mode" 
coverage of the aftermath of Katrina, there have been a number of 
professional challenges for everyone in the media around racial and economic 
sensitivity. The hurricane coverage also is taking place in a predominantly 
poor, black part of the country. "I am curious how one photographer knew the 
food was looted by one but not the other . Should editors in a rush to 
publish poignant or startling images, relax their standards or allow 
personal or regional biases creep into captions and stories?" Pazzanese 
asks. We all should be asking that question too.













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