[Marxism] Kyrgyz Capital: Otpor/Kmara/Pora-Bred Agents Get Their Comeuppance

davidquarter at sympatico.ca davidquarter at sympatico.ca
Thu Mar 24 22:42:43 MST 2005


On 23 Mar 2005 at 18:38, Rick Rozoff wrote:


http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,3-1538737,00.html


The Times (London)
March 24, 2005



Riot police put the squeeze on bid for lemon
revolution
Jeremy Page  
 

-They ['opposition'] want a “lemon” revolution
inspired by the Orange Revolution in Ukraine and the
Rose Revolution in Georgia.
-Edil Baisalov, head of the *Coalition for Democracy
and Civil Society,* was among those pushed on to buses
and taken to a police station for questioning.
-The stand-off has....widened a rift between Russia
and the West, which accuse each other of meddling in
elections in the former Soviet Union for geopolitical
gains. 
-Kyrgyzstan....shares a border with China and hosts
Russian and US military bases. Russia has accused the
Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe
of stoking unrest by declaring the election
undemocratic.



Bishek - Riot police broke up opposition protests in
Bishkek, the capital of Kyrgyzstan, yesterday as the
new Interior Minister said that he may use force to
quell the unrest gripping the Central Asian nation. 

President Akayev dismissed the previous Interior
Minister and the Prosecutor-General for letting the
Opposition seize southern cities in protest at
disputed parliamentary elections. 

They want a “lemon” revolution inspired by the Orange
Revolution in Ukraine and the Rose Revolution in
Georgia. Mr Akayev had promised on Tuesday not to use
force to end the crisis, which he sees as a
Western-funded plot to stir another revolution in the
former Soviet Union, but Keneshbek Dushebayev, the new
Interior Minister, said: “The law gives us every right
to take action, including using physical force,
special means and firearms. 

“We will not shoot at peace-loving, law-abiding
citizens — women, old people, children — but
peace-loving citizens would never take over government
buildings.” 

The hardline approach of the former Bishkek police
chief was evident when 200 opposition supporters
gathered in the centre of the city, shouting
anti-Akayev slogans. Riot police in camouflage gear
and white helmets charged in, beating and kicking some
protesters and detaining several dozen ringleaders. 

Edil Baisalov, head of the Coalition for Democracy and
Civil Society, was among those pushed on to buses and
taken to a police station for questioning. “The new
police chief wants to show he’s a tough guy — the
level of tolerance is definitely getting lower,” he
said. Mr Baisalov promised further protests in Bishkek
today. 

This week police fled when opposition supporters armed
with petrol bombs stormed government and police
headquarters in the southern cities of Osh and
Jalalabad, which they now control. 

The stand-off has led to fears of civil war between
the poor south, which has large Uzbek and Tajik
populations, and the wealthier north, which is
dominated by ethnic Kyrgyz. It has widened a rift
between Russia and the West, which accuse each other
of meddling in elections in the former Soviet Union
for geopolitical gains. 

Kyrgyzstan is mountainous, has few natural resources
and only five million people. It shares a border with
China and hosts Russian and US military bases. Russia
has accused the Organisation for Security and
Co-operation in Europe of stoking unrest by declaring
the election undemocratic. Sergei Lavrov, the Russian
Foreign Minister, told Javier Solana, the European
Union foreign policy chief, yesterday that his
statements on the crisis “could be used by the
opposition to increase tensions”. 

Nikolai Tanayev, the Prime Minister of Kyrgyzstan, is
expected to travel to Osh today to negotiate with the
Opposition. Osmonakun Ibraimov, the country’s
Secretary of State and a close ally of Mr Akayev, told
The Times that the Government favoured a peaceful
solution. “The only way to solve this problem is
through negotiations with the Opposition,” he said. 

Mr Akayev would never agree to demands to resign, he
said. Mr Akayev has said that he will step down for a
presidential election in October in the first
democratic transition of power in Central Asia. 
.... 
  



		





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