[Marxism] Re: Greens win at least 19 races in Nov. 2005 elections

Jon Flanders jonflanders at jflan.net
Thu Nov 10 20:07:36 MST 2005


> Fuck! I didn't even know they were on the ballot. Well, maybe they 
> weren't--just a write-in. I guess that just indicates how weak they are 
> that they didn't even make their presence felt on the Internet where email 
> communications are free. 

Here's a report below from our Capital District Greens on their New York
State effort.

In Albany, Alice Green, a well known black activist, won 25% of the vote
in the mayoral race. Albany is still a city with an entrenched
Democratic machine that has strong labor support, so clearly she got a
lot of votes from the black community.

Nevertheless, I found it interesting that when the cameras pulled back
to show her supporters on election night, the only people visible were
white GP members. I think this shows the fear still out there in the
community of bucking that DP machine.

The Troy Area Labor Council, of which I am a member, gave a lot of
support to the campaign of Susan Haynes, running for a spot on the
suburban town of Brunswick's town council. She was part of a smart
growth group that arose in opposition to the proposal to build a Super
Walmart and some other mega condo projects in the town. She came a
hundred votes short of winning, but did well enough to put some fear
into a Republican machine that has dominated Rensselaer county politics
forever.

Upstate New York politics is of course dominated by the Republican
Party. However, the Congressional Districts are gerry-mandered between
the two parties in such a contorted fashion that it is virtually
impossible for a Republican to lose in their suburban-ex-urban-rural
districts or ditto for the Democrats in the urban congressional
districts.

Jon Flanders



> 
Capital District Greens

Media Release
For More Info: Peter LaVenia 518 463-8653
Green Party Has Best Showing Ever in New York State 

Party Confident of Recapturing Full Party Status in 2006 Gubernatorial
Elections

 

The Green Party had its best electoral showing ever in New York State
this year, including electing its 5th current office holder. The Greens
also did well nationwide. 

The Greens said their strong showing in the 2005 elections bodes well
for the party obtaining at least the 50,000 votes (approximately 1%)
needed to regain their official party status. While the Greens
successfully sued in federal court to retain the right to enroll as
Greens, their candidates are forced to comply with the more difficult
ballot access rules for independent candidates. More than 37,000 New
Yorkers are enrolled Green Party members
 

Mary Jo Long, who pulled more than 50,000 votes for the Greens three
years ago in her race for Attorney General, was elected to the Afton
Town Board. She joins four other elected Green officials in Ulster and
Monroe Counties. 

The Greens ran Mayoral candidates in four of the state’s largest cities,
with civil rights advocate Dr. Alice Green pulling a stunning 25% of the
vote in the City of Albany, easily surpassing the Republican vote total.
The Green candidate for Albany Common Council, Dave Lussier, pulled 29%
of the vote on the Green and WFP line, with most of his votes coming on
the Green line. In Syracuse, former Green State Comptroller candidate
Howie Hawkins pulled 5% of the vote while Judith Eniach pulled 4% in the
City of Buffalo.
 

"The results in Albany highlight that voters are increasingly responding
to the Green Party message.  For Alice Green to receive 25% of the vote
in a citywide election, and David Lussier to achieve 30% of the vote in
a 4-way council race, both finishing second ahead of the Republicans,
means that we can expect further successes here next year in our quest
to regain ballot status as a party," stated Peter LaVenia, Chair of the
Albany County Green Party. 
 

Dr. Green was the Green Party nominee for Lt. Governor seven years ago
when she and Al Lewis pulled 53,000 votes statewide to quality the
party. Some party organizers are hoping to draft her to run for Governor
next year. 

In Rensselaer County, Green Party secretary Dan Spilman received votes
from about 35% of the electorate, finishing third in a race for two
seats on the Schodack Town Board. Green Party chair Russell Ziemba was
nominated by the Democrats and Working Families Party and received over
3,300 votes in his bid for a County Legislative Seat from Troy. 

In New York City, peace and labor activist Gloria Mattera qualified for
$200,000 in matching funds in her race for Brooklyn Borough President,
and received 17,908 votes (6.9%). Ms. Mattera, the Chair of the State
Party, had pulled 20% of the vote in her prior race for a City Council
position. Green City Council candidate Robyn Sklar also qualified for
public campaign funds in NYC and pulled 12.9% of the vote. Jerry Kann
pulled 8% of the vote in his race for a City Council position from
Queens. 

“Once again, voters nationwide have demonstrated their enthusiasm for
Green Party candidates who make issues of  social and economic justice
the highlight of their platforms.  In the aftermath of Katrina and the
continued occupation of Iraq, the Green Party offers people an
opportunity to support candidates who will be a catalyst for change,”
stated Mattera. 

According to early election returns, Greens have won at least 19 races
in November 2005, bringing the number of Greens elected in 2005 to 34. 

The Greens noted that their candidates picked up an increasing number of
endorsements from other groups, including local Labor Councils, Empire
Pride Agenda, National Organization for Women, Sierra Club and
newspapers. 

In other races statewide, Darin Robbins received 25.3% for Corning
Alderman in Steuben County.  David Linton received 17% of the vote for
Onondaga County Legislature with Cosmo Fanizi pulling 13%. Chris
Hilderbrant obtained 15.1% of the vote in his run for Monroe County
Legislature.  Will Maksuta  received 13.4% of the vote running for New
Paltz Town Clerk in Ulster County.  

The Greens are committed to ecology, nonviolence, grassroots democracy
and social and economic justice.








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