[Marxism] Blair suspects Iran role in Iraq attacks

Brian Shannon Brian_Shannon at verizon.net
Thu Oct 6 07:45:39 MDT 2005


And there were Weapons of Mass Destruction in Iraq, but Iran removed 
them to develop its own nuclear weapons. And Iraq was attempting to buy 
uranium in Africa (the UK foreign office really does still maintain 
that it has secret information regarding this), and those uranium 
yellow cakes are now in Iran. And the devices that look like those used 
by Hezbollah are aluminum tubes that look like the tubes in Iraq that 
looked like tubes used to develop nuclear capability. And the boy who 
cried Wolf too many times actually did sees wolves the first two times. 
In fact, all of the monsters in Grimm's fairy tales really did exist 
and dinosaurs coexisted with Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden.

Brian Shannon
____________________________


Blair suspects Iran role in Iraq attacks
The Associated Press

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2005
Prime Minister Tony Blair said Thursday that new explosive devices used 
against coalition forces in Iraq ''lead us either to Iranian elements 
or to Hezbollah.''

While stressing that Britain ''cannot be sure'' about Iran's possible 
role, the prime minister linked the issue to the diplomatic 
confrontation between Tehran and Western nations over Iran's nuclear 
program.

''There is no justification for Iran or any other country interfering 
in Iraq,'' Blair said during a news conference with Iraqi President 
Jalal Talabani.

''Neither will be subject to any intimidation in raising the necessary 
and live issues to do with the nuclear weapons obligations under the 
(International) Atomic Energy Agency treaty.''

On Wednesday, Press Association reported that a senior government 
official said Britain believed Iran's Revolutionary Guard supplied 
explosives technology to insurgents in Iraq that was used to kill eight 
British soldiers over the summer.

The official, briefing reporters on condition of anonymity, said there 
was evidence that Iran was in contact with Sunni Muslim insurgent 
groups battling coalition forces. He did not specify whether the 
alleged Iranian technology also was responsible for American soldiers' 
deaths, according to Press Association.

Tehran's Foreign Ministry dismissed the accusations Wednesday, with a 
spokesman saying Britain should provide evidence of its claims, 
according to the official Islamic Republic News Agency.

On Thursday, Blair appeared to back away slightly from the accusations 
made a day earlier.

''We know that the devices are of a similar nature to those used by 
Hezbollah, and there are certain pieces of information that lead us 
back to Iran,'' Blair said. ''But I'm not saying any more than that — 
we cannot be sure of this.''

He continued, ''What is clear is that there have been new explosive 
devices used, not just against British troops but elsewhere in Iraq. 
The particular nature of those devices lead us either to Iranian 
elements or to Hezbollah, because they are similar to the devices used 
by Hezbollah.''

Hezbollah was formed in 1982 with Iranian backing during Israel's 
invasion of Lebanon. It has been linked to the 1983 bombing of U.S. 
Marine barracks in Lebanon.

Iran is estimated to provide it with $10 million-$20 million monthly.


Prime Minister Tony Blair said Thursday that new explosive devices used 
against coalition forces in Iraq ''lead us either to Iranian elements 
or to Hezbollah.''

While stressing that Britain ''cannot be sure'' about Iran's possible 
role, the prime minister linked the issue to the diplomatic 
confrontation between Tehran and Western nations over Iran's nuclear 
program.

''There is no justification for Iran or any other country interfering 
in Iraq,'' Blair said during a news conference with Iraqi President 
Jalal Talabani.

''Neither will be subject to any intimidation in raising the necessary 
and live issues to do with the nuclear weapons obligations under the 
(International) Atomic Energy Agency treaty.''

On Wednesday, Press Association reported that a senior government 
official said Britain believed Iran's Revolutionary Guard supplied 
explosives technology to insurgents in Iraq that was used to kill eight 
British soldiers over the summer.

The official, briefing reporters on condition of anonymity, said there 
was evidence that Iran was in contact with Sunni Muslim insurgent 
groups battling coalition forces. He did not specify whether the 
alleged Iranian technology also was responsible for American soldiers' 
deaths, according to Press Association.

Tehran's Foreign Ministry dismissed the accusations Wednesday, with a 
spokesman saying Britain should provide evidence of its claims, 
according to the official Islamic Republic News Agency.

On Thursday, Blair appeared to back away slightly from the accusations 
made a day earlier.

''We know that the devices are of a similar nature to those used by 
Hezbollah, and there are certain pieces of information that lead us 
back to Iran,'' Blair said. ''But I'm not saying any more than that — 
we cannot be sure of this.''

He continued, ''What is clear is that there have been new explosive 
devices used, not just against British troops but elsewhere in Iraq. 
The particular nature of those devices lead us either to Iranian 
elements or to Hezbollah, because they are similar to the devices used 
by Hezbollah.''

Hezbollah was formed in 1982 with Iranian backing during Israel's 
invasion of Lebanon. It has been linked to the 1983 bombing of U.S. 
Marine barracks in Lebanon.

Iran is estimated to provide it with $10 million-$20 million monthly.


Prime Minister Tony Blair said Thursday that new explosive devices used 
against coalition forces in Iraq ''lead us either to Iranian elements 
or to Hezbollah.''

While stressing that Britain ''cannot be sure'' about Iran's possible 
role, the prime minister linked the issue to the diplomatic 
confrontation between Tehran and Western nations over Iran's nuclear 
program.

''There is no justification for Iran or any other country interfering 
in Iraq,'' Blair said during a news conference with Iraqi President 
Jalal Talabani.

''Neither will be subject to any intimidation in raising the necessary 
and live issues to do with the nuclear weapons obligations under the 
(International) Atomic Energy Agency treaty.''

On Wednesday, Press Association reported that a senior government 
official said Britain believed Iran's Revolutionary Guard supplied 
explosives technology to insurgents in Iraq that was used to kill eight 
British soldiers over the summer.

The official, briefing reporters on condition of anonymity, said there 
was evidence that Iran was in contact with Sunni Muslim insurgent 
groups battling coalition forces. He did not specify whether the 
alleged Iranian technology also was responsible for American soldiers' 
deaths, according to Press Association.

Tehran's Foreign Ministry dismissed the accusations Wednesday, with a 
spokesman saying Britain should provide evidence of its claims, 
according to the official Islamic Republic News Agency.

On Thursday, Blair appeared to back away slightly from the accusations 
made a day earlier.

''We know that the devices are of a similar nature to those used by 
Hezbollah, and there are certain pieces of information that lead us 
back to Iran,'' Blair said. ''But I'm not saying any more than that — 
we cannot be sure of this.''

He continued, ''What is clear is that there have been new explosive 
devices used, not just against British troops but elsewhere in Iraq. 
The particular nature of those devices lead us either to Iranian 
elements or to Hezbollah, because they are similar to the devices used 
by Hezbollah.''

Hezbollah was formed in 1982 with Iranian backing during Israel's 
invasion of Lebanon. It has been linked to the 1983 bombing of U.S. 
Marine barracks in Lebanon.

Iran is estimated to provide it with $10 million-$20 million monthly.


Prime Minister Tony Blair said Thursday that new explosive devices used 
against coalition forces in Iraq ''lead us either to Iranian elements 
or to Hezbollah.''

While stressing that Britain ''cannot be sure'' about Iran's possible 
role, the prime minister linked the issue to the diplomatic 
confrontation between Tehran and Western nations over Iran's nuclear 
program.

''There is no justification for Iran or any other country interfering 
in Iraq,'' Blair said during a news conference with Iraqi President 
Jalal Talabani.

''Neither will be subject to any intimidation in raising the necessary 
and live issues to do with the nuclear weapons obligations under the 
(International) Atomic Energy Agency treaty.''

On Wednesday, Press Association reported that a senior government 
official said Britain believed Iran's Revolutionary Guard supplied 
explosives technology to insurgents in Iraq that was used to kill eight 
British soldiers over the summer.

The official, briefing reporters on condition of anonymity, said there 
was evidence that Iran was in contact with Sunni Muslim insurgent 
groups battling coalition forces. He did not specify whether the 
alleged Iranian technology also was responsible for American soldiers' 
deaths, according to Press Association.

Tehran's Foreign Ministry dismissed the accusations Wednesday, with a 
spokesman saying Britain should provide evidence of its claims, 
according to the official Islamic Republic News Agency.

On Thursday, Blair appeared to back away slightly from the accusations 
made a day earlier.

''We know that the devices are of a similar nature to those used by 
Hezbollah, and there are certain pieces of information that lead us 
back to Iran,'' Blair said. ''But I'm not saying any more than that — 
we cannot be sure of this.''

He continued, ''What is clear is that there have been new explosive 
devices used, not just against British troops but elsewhere in Iraq. 
The particular nature of those devices lead us either to Iranian 
elements or to Hezbollah, because they are similar to the devices used 
by Hezbollah.''

Hezbollah was formed in 1982 with Iranian backing during Israel's 
invasion of Lebanon. It has been linked to the 1983 bombing of U.S. 
Marine barracks in Lebanon.

Iran is estimated to provide it with $10 million-$20 million monthly.

  




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