[Marxism] Struggle to safeguard San Francisco Peaks

Hunter Gray hunterbadbear at earthlink.net
Sat Oct 8 01:49:04 MDT 2005


NOTE BY HUNTER BEAR:

The fight to safeguard the San Francisco Peaks just north of Flagstaff,
AZ -- a sacrosanct religious setting, ancient and vital, for the Navajo and
Hopi nations and a dozen other regional tribes -- looks like it could be a
long one.  They are vigorously opposing the commercial expansion of the
Snowbowl -- located well up on the huge mountain's slope.

As I've mentioned before, I grew up north of Flag and literally right under
The Peaks, from whose highest point, Humphreys Peak [13,000 feet above sea
level], one can see into five states [plus Arizona itself, of course]  and
Mexico.

Janice Schneider, an obvious Bushie, apparently doesn't care to recognize
the contradiction between her ostensible concern about the "imperatives of
religious servitude over an entire community" and her "big" boss's bizarre
efforts to force his fundamentalist views on the entire United States [and
maybe the World as well.]  Anyway, much of Flagstaff and more indeed support
the Native nations on this critical issue.  It should be added that at least
one Demo, Bruce Babbitt [of Flagstaff], a professed environmentalist,
supports the Bushie stance and the Snow Bowl et al.  [But Bruce, who as Gov
sold out the copper strikers twenty years ago, has never been noted for his
courage.]

H.

------------------------

. . .Janice Schneider, an assistant U.S. attorney representing the Forest
Service, said that if the decision went against the Snowbowl, the area would
be forced to close given the recent drought in the Southwest.

"It would also represent the imperatives of religious servitude over an
entire community," Schneider said.


Tribes criticize Forest Service during hearing on snowmaking

Mark Shaffer
Republic Flagstaff Bureau
Oct. 7, 2005 12:00 AM

PRESCOTT - Attorneys for northern Arizona's tribes said Thursday that the
U.S. Forest Service never seriously analyzed Native American objections to
snowmaking from reclaimed wastewater at Arizona Snowbowl and preordained
approval of it in June.

The comments came during the first day of a hearing seeking summary judgment
against Coconino National Forest and to reopen an environmental study of the
effects of reclaimed wastewater on the San Francisco Peaks.

U. S. District Judge Paul Rosenblatt will likely rule on the
summary-judgment motion today after the hearing is concluded. If the motion
is dismissed, a full hearing, which will determine the fate of snowmaking
and other ski-area improvements, will be held next Wednesday.

Lawsuits filed by six tribes and three conservation groups were combined
into one by Rosenblatt after the Forest Service approved Snowbowl's plans.

"There was no good-faith effort in dealing with the tribes," said Howard
Shanker, a Valley attorney representing six of the plaintiffs.

Shanker said the decision failed to take into consideration such things as
water recharge in the Flagstaff area, children eating the snow while at the
ski area and the desecration of a religious shrine central to many creation
stories of the state's tribes.

But Janice Schneider, an assistant U.S. attorney representing the Forest
Service, said that if the decision went against the Snowbowl, the area would
be forced to close given the recent drought in the Southwest.

"It would also represent the imperatives of religious servitude over an
entire community," Schneider said.

Rachel Dougan, another assistant U.S. attorney, said the Forest Service's
study went into painstaking detail with "pages after pages" explaining
tribal perspectives about the peaks.

The Forest Service's decision concluded that interest in skiing and the
economic benefits to Flagstaff outweighed Native American religious
concerns.

If Rosenblatt sides with Snowbowl, 15 miles of pipeline will be laid from
central Flagstaff to the ski area, and snowmaking is expected to be in place
by the start of the 2006-07 season.

But much of the attention on this day was on what effects there would be
from treated wastewater, which lawyers say will have high quantities of
medical and other undesirable waste. But the Arizona Department of
Environmental Quality has certified the water to be used for snowmaking
purposes.

HUNTER GRAY  [HUNTER BEAR/JOHN R SALTER JR]   Mi'kmaq /St. Francis
 Abenaki/St. Regis Mohawk
In the mountains of Eastern Idaho
 www.hunterbear.org
Protected by Na´shdo´i´ba´i´
 and Ohkwari'

Check out this significant honor: my 2005 Elder Recognition Award from
Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Story Tellers
http://www.hunterbear.org/elder_recognition_award_for_2005.htm

In our Gray Hole, the ghosts often dance in the junipers and sage, on the
game trails, in the tributary canyons with the thick red maples, and on the
high windy ridges -- and they dance from within the very essence of our own
inner being. They do this especially when the bright night moon shines down
on the clean white snow that covers the valley and its surroundings.  Then
it is as bright as day -- but in an always soft and mysterious and
remembering way. [Hunter Bear]















More information about the Marxism mailing list