[Marxism] Andrew Jackson

Jim Farmelant farmelantj at juno.com
Fri Oct 14 07:19:13 MDT 2005



On Fri, 14 Oct 2005 03:32:29 -0400 "Mark Lause" <MLause at cinci.rr.com>
writes:
> Algie M. Simons and other critics were on the losing end of the 


> 
> The kinship was, in large part, genuine.  All three were icons of
> institutional racism in terms of African-Americans or of ethnic
> cleansing when it came to some other groups...Native Americans or 
> the
> Japanese.  Of course, it should be added that none of them--nor 
> their
> contemporary Democratic Party standards--had any doubt as to whether 
> the
> Irish...or the Jews...were "white."  All the Caucasian groups were 
> going
> to be beneficiaries of the liberalizing Democratic order as much as 
> the
> fate of "the colored" were just not going to matter.  

Well it was precisely under FDR that African-Americans
switched their political allegiences from the Republicans
to the Democrats.  Apparently, they believed themselves
to be beneficiaries of the New Deal.  I am not aware
of Roosevelt ever publicly expressing racist opinions
concerning African-Americans (as opposed to the
Japanese whom he interned in WW II). That's
not to deny that FDR failed to take a public stand
against Jim Crow but I don't think that anyone views
him as having been an avowed believer in segregation.

The case of Wilson is different because he was an
avowed supporter of segregation. Indeed as president
he went out of his way to impose segregationist
policies on the Federal civil service.  He didn't make
any great secret of his views concerning race.

> 
> Each of these liberal icons ascribed the most reactionary features 
> of
> their racial policies as reflecting "the will of the people," but
> Jackson never campaigned as the candidate for Indian Removal or 
> Wilson
> as the Jim Crow candidate.  People did not necessarily vote for FDR
> because he was a defender of Jim Crow and the instigator of Japanese
> removal.  In essence, I think the only thing most voters for Jackson 
> or
> for Wilson or for FDR were expressing clearly was their consumerist
> appreciation of their images. 
> 
> In end, though, Jackson, Wilson and FDR would claim their elections 
> as a
> sufficient mandate to justify the racialism of their policies.  I 
> can't
> see the fearful spectre that's supposed to be haunting the western 
> world
> assenting to this assertion...like it was a little liberal troll who
> interacts with the world through riddles.
>  
> Solidarity!
> Mark L.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ________________________________________________
> YOU MUST clip all extraneous text before replying to a message.
> Send list submissions to: Marxism at lists.econ.utah.edu
> Set your options at: 
> http://lists.econ.utah.edu/mailman/listinfo/marxism
> 





More information about the Marxism mailing list