[Marxism] The line between civil and military in caudillos

Nestor Gorojovsky nestorgoro at fibertel.com.ar
Thu Oct 20 13:10:28 MDT 2005


Respuesta a:"Marxism Digest, Vol 24, Issue 52"
Enviado por:marxism-request at lists.econ.utah.edu
Con fecha:20 Oct 2005, a las 8:53

> My impression has been that the between civil and military was simply
> blurred beyond clear distinction in the caudillo, but always glad to
> learn something new.

I am sure that what follows can be applied to L.A. as a whole, but I 
will stick myself to the River Plate area, which is the one I know 
best.  Within a few days you will get a mail by yours truly which 
will help you understand this careful standing.  Quoting by unchecked 
hearsay is bad practice, and I have done it at least once, thus 
harming on this list the reputation of an excellent Argentinean.

In the River Plate area, there was a civil war that, with short 
truces in between, lasted from, say, 1810 to 1880.  Politics was 
militarized as a whole.  Under this situation, the "caudillo" was 
both the political representative, the military chief, and the union 
organizer of the gaucho.

A different kind of female "caudillo" (never called themselves like 
that, nor were known as "caudillas", they simply acted as such) was 
Manuela Sáenz, the lover and chief defender of Bolívar during his 
late years.

Este correo lo ha enviado
Néstor Miguel Gorojovsky
nestorgoro at fibertel.com.ar
[No necesariamente es su autor]
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"La patria tiene que ser la dignidad arriba y el regocijo abajo".
Aparicio Saravia
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