[Marxism] Damon calls Shepherd relevant to today

Walter Lippmann walterlx at earthlink.net
Fri Dec 22 11:00:51 MST 2006


Of course this doesn't guarantee that it's any good as a movie.
It might be good or it might be dreck. I notice that other than
the review by Ken Turan in today's L.A. Times, a number of the
other reviews I've seen so far are panning it as a turkey. I plan
to see the movie soon. A link to the discouraging review in the
New York Times is posted below


Walter Lippmann

========================================

Dec. 22, 2006, 9:03AM
Damon calls Shepherd relevant to today
New film explores the old days of CIA
By TODD HILL
Newhouse News Service 
SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE

Dec. 22, 2006, 9:03AM
Damon calls Shepherd relevant to today
New film explores the old days of CIA

By TODD HILL
Newhouse News Service

NEW YORK - In the new film The Good Shepherd, actor Matt Damon plays
a young man who comes out of Yale University's secretive Skull and
Bones Society in 1939 to work during World War II for the
government's Office of Strategic Services, the precursor to the
Central Intelligence Agency.

The film, directed by Robert De Niro, concludes with the botched Bay
of Pigs invasion of Cuba in 1961.

"These guys must have felt like it was manifest destiny by the end of
the 1950s," Damon said recently.

"They'd never suffered a loss. They were on top of the world, and
that kind of power is really dangerous," said the actor.

"I think in the day and age we're living in, where we see the
foundations of our democracy being eaten away at, gnawed away at by
secrets and by things happening in secret, I think it's good that
there's a movie out there that can be a topic of discussion for
people.

full:
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/ent/4418808.html

NEW YORK TIMES final paragraph
Who rules the drones in “The Good Shepherd”? Who is IT? The
president, the people, American mining and banana companies, the
ghosts of fathers past, the agency itself? It’s hard to know, though
now the C.I.A. answers to the Office of the Director of National
Intelligence. These are hard questions, but they are also too big,
too complex and perhaps too painful for even this ambitious (2 hours,
37 minutes) project, which can only elude and insinuate, not
enlighten and inform. Although the film seems true in broad outline
and scrupulous detail, and the postwar Berlin rubble looks as real as
the documentary footage of Fidel Castro slipped between the lightly
fictionalized intrigue, there is something ungraspable and unknowable
about this world, even if it is also one we ourselves have helped
create.

http://movies2.nytimes.com/2006/12/22/movies/22shep.html






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