[Marxism] Bush's approval rating at all-time low

mlause at cinci.rr.com mlause at cinci.rr.com
Fri Jan 27 10:25:18 MST 2006


Regardless of what they say publicly, what I hear among the self-
described conservative "Christian" folks here in "the heartland" leads 
me to think that Bush's credibility among them has pretty much 
disappeared...excepting those who live in immediate expectation of The 
Rapture, of course.

As usual, these kinds of polling questions are posed in a way to load 
the results....

"Are you willing to give up some civil liberties to gain more 
security?"  The assumption is that you can and will gain more security 
by giving up some civil liberties, right?  Put this way, though, many 
more people will answer positively.

"Do you favor immediate withdrawal of U.S. troops from Iraq or 
maintining a military presence until the country is stabilized?"  The 
assumption is that you can stabilize a country through foreign 
military occupation--a concept that will have made stand on end even 
the wig hairs of the esteemed gentleman at Mount Vernon.  But asking 
the question in this way tilts the result towards the latter response.

I don't have before me the script of that 1986 episode of YES, PRIME 
MINISTER, in which Sir Humphrey Appleby (the civil servant) explains 
the function of polls to his colleagues.  In about two minutes, Sir 
Humphrey responds to a party poll showing 64% of the British public 
favorable to military conscription with directions on how to put 
together another poll that would show 64% of them critical of the 
draft.  The point of political polls is not to locate any more than 
elections are ways for government to reflect public opinion in any 
way.  The important thing is not to do either but to appear to do them.

In that delicious YPM exchange, someone asks, "But surely there are 
honest polls?" to which Sir Humphrey replies with something like "Yes, 
but nobody pays much attention to them."

Solidarity!
Mark L.














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