[Marxism] Forwarded on MR and Maoism

Louis Proyect lnp3 at panix.com
Wed Oct 14 08:50:57 MDT 2009


(Ethan, please use PLAIN TEXT in the future. This  bounced because it 
was sent in HTML.)


Subject: Re: [Marxism] Literature on Western Maoism
From: Ethan Young <ethanyoung at earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 14 Oct 2009 09:14:41 -0400 (EDT)
To: marxism at lists.econ.utah.edu

Monthly Review does not hide its pro-Cultural Revolution sympathies - in 
fact they just published a new book taking this now-rare view: 
http://www.monthlyreview.org/books/unkculturalrevolution.php

On US Maoism: http://www.revolutionintheair.com/

US & French Maoism: Belden Fields: Trotskyism and Maoism: Theory and 
Practice in France and the United States.

Probably the key work drawing interest in China within the US 60s 
movement was William Hinton's Fanshen. The success of the Progressive 
Labor Party in building a powerful faction in SDS played a role; PL was 
the largest Maoist party in the US in the 60s, before they broke with 
China. Maoism drew support from important black figures and groups, 
including Shirley Graham DuBois, Robert F. Williams, Bill Epton, Malcolm 
X [who saw China as an example of a united anti-imperialist nation], Max 
Stanford, the Black Panther Party and the Black Workers Congress.

Most of the information on China came directly from China, in the form 
of the weekly Peking Review, as well as reports from western China 
supporters like Anna Louise Strong, Felix Greene and Maud Russell, who 
published the newsletter Far East Reporter. The largest independent 
far-left paper, the Guardian, was pro-China in the 50s through the early 
70s.
ey




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