[Marxism] hackerspaces and socialism

Jeffrey Masko j.alan.masko at gmail.com
Thu May 2 08:51:08 MDT 2013


I don't think I was missing your point, but perhaps wasn't clear. I was
trying to underline the reasons we see these kinds of stories in the media
and why hacking collectives like the Rustle League get little air time or
exposure. These types of stories (and those detailing hacking competitions)
precisely undermine any possibilities that technologies may have for social
good by consigning them to lifestyle choices or worse yet, job skills to be
attained for the labor market. Hacking in the eyes of capital must be
rehabilitated in order to remove it as a tool for revolutionary change and
that is done through media by equating it with criminality or rebranding it
as this story does.

You are certainly correct in saying this "won't happen through glorifying
them as 'prefigurative' institutions, but will rather depend on first
destroying the old society and its state from root to branch," but being
mindful of how alternative lifestyles are presented will enable us to
counter the agendas of the mainstream press.


On Thu, May 2, 2013 at 10:27 AM, Andrew Pollack <acpollack2 at gmail.com>wrote:

> ======================================================================
> Rule #1: YOU MUST clip all extraneous text when replying to a message.
> ======================================================================
>
>
> You're totally missing my point. I'm not saying the existing clubs or
> networks have ANY revolutionary potential. Rather, I'm saying they're
> another example of the objective, technical possibilities. That's all.
>
> Just as I would never say McDonald's or any other massive, commodified food
> chain represents anything other than the objective, technical possibility
> of collective food production and consumption -- under a different state,
> and with a vastly different menu!
>
>
> On Thu, May 2, 2013 at 10:19 AM, Jeffrey Masko <j.alan.masko at gmail.com
> >wrote:
>
> > ======================================================================
> > Rule #1: YOU MUST clip all extraneous text when replying to a message.
> > ======================================================================
> >
> >
> > I see a connection between this and hacker competitions like Pwn2Own that
> > are trying to move hacking away from something that challenges state and
> > industrial control into a way of bringing more rebellious hackers into
> the
> > fold. Seems about as revolutionary as dot.com start ups making
> work-spaces
> > "fun" and "livable" by having open floor plans, nerf basketball and
> smoking
> > week at your workstation.
> >
> >
> > On Thu, May 2, 2013 at 9:20 AM, Andrew Pollack <acpollack2 at gmail.com>
> > wrote:
> >
> > > ======================================================================
> > > Rule #1: YOU MUST clip all extraneous text when replying to a message.
> > > ======================================================================
> > >
> > >
> > > In the Times today there's an article entitled "One Big Workbench"
> about
> > > hackerspaces where people come together to share space and resources
> for
> > > hobbies -- in this case mostly mechanical and electronic, but the
> concept
> > > of hackerspace is much broader. I was unfamiliar with the term; its
> Wiki
> > > entry links to commons-based peer production.
> > >
> > > All of which relates to previous discussions here about possible
> > > alternative work/leisure models (and for overcoming the separation
> > between
> > > the spheres -- including first and foremost for childcare, cooking,
> > > healthcare and education, etc.).
> > >
> > > Needless to say making such alternative spaces available to all, much
> > less
> > > building a society in which they play a significant role in our
> everyday
> > > lives, won't happen through glorifying them as "prefigurative"
> > > institutions, but will rather depend on first destroying the old
> society
> > > and its state from root to branch.
> > >
> > > See, on both alternative lifestyles and a thoroughgoing revolution
> making
> > > them possible, William Morris's "News from Nowhere."
> > >
> > >
> > >
> >
> http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/02/garden/the-rise-of-the-hacker-space.html?_r=0
> > >
> > > commons-based peer production
> > > ________________________________________________
> > > Send list submissions to: Marxism at greenhouse.economics.utah.edu
> > > Set your options at:
> > >
> >
> http://greenhouse.economics.utah.edu/mailman/options/marxism/mediacrusher%40gmail.com
> > >
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> > J.A. Masko
> > College of Communications
> > Penn State University
> > State College, Pa 16801
> > ________________________________________________
> > Send list submissions to: Marxism at greenhouse.economics.utah.edu
> > Set your options at:
> >
> http://greenhouse.economics.utah.edu/mailman/options/marxism/acpollack2%40gmail.com
> >
> ________________________________________________
> Send list submissions to: Marxism at greenhouse.economics.utah.edu
> Set your options at:
> http://greenhouse.economics.utah.edu/mailman/options/marxism/mediacrusher%40gmail.com
>



-- 
J.A. Masko
College of Communications
Penn State University
State College, Pa 16801



More information about the Marxism mailing list