[Marxism] Hezbollah's Al-Manar network praising Joe Biden

Anas anaselhaouat at yahoo.com
Fri Jun 20 19:35:38 MDT 2014


That I would be called a jihadist sympathizer, I never imagined would happen. As they say, politics makes strange bed fellows, I would say paranoid politics accuses stranger bed fellows. And this is where I would feel guilty, and argue by going on and on about how "you're drawing a false dichotomy" and how "jihadists are serving the counter revolutionary interests of Gulf States and the gulf bourgeoisie." I won't do that. So, speaking to someone like you in terms of class analysis amounts to no avail, but I'll try.

The Assad regime is one known marked by terror. Even its Syrian supporters know that. Many of them openly say that Assad isn't violent enough. Minus the terror of the tanks and air power (except Hama 1982) , the regime has been doing what it's doing now has been doing for 34 years systematically and behind closed doors. For fuck's sake, even the most hard line Arab Baathists acknowledge that this regime is one of terror. Or as they would call it: "necessary terror". 
I was discussing this subject with a Syrian friend once, and he remarked to me that a proverb that probably every Syrian knows is "the walls have ears". He said the first time he heard this was from his 3 grade teacher. What does it say about a society like that when young children are taught to be careful what comes of out mouth? Terror doesn't come in 45-second videos of bearded men chopping their opponents' heads off and shouting "Allahu Akbar". It comes from organized State power with its prisons, wards, schools and indoctrinated functionaries.

Rebel groups have shown impressive ways to raise funding, get weapons, organize and recruit. I'm pretty sure they could set up a good PR team, but they're not interested of winning the support of a well-meaning liberal in Colorado or Beirut. The most power hungry rebels happen to be the jihadists, and notice that their videos of executions and torture aren't shot by some courageous NBC reporter, but by themselves. 
Theirs is a local struggle and it's a classic case of using force and intimidation to demoralize opponents and generate a monopoly of fear and power.  They want their power to be visible to show where is the power emanating from. The Assad regime doesn't need this. But its violence and terror are quieter, more diffused and invisible. I mean, this is elementary power 101; terror (and propaganda) is used because it works. I condemn this of course, but that would be like condemning JP Morgan Chase for making hefty profits from risky investments. They do it because it's a "natural law" in the system it exists. 


I knew someone who was tortured in Bashar Al Assad's jails. So too was his father, but in Hafez Al Assad's jails. Something is unnatural about having a son who gets tortured by the son of the man who tortured you. How's that for some "necessary terror"? 

Stories of men watching their wives being raped by security agents and leaving your country never finding out which prison your son was sent to should be more important to taking a position on this conflict rather than putting a minus wherever the US puts a plus. 



> On Jun 20, 2014, at 7:49 PM, Shane Mage <shmage at pipeline.com> wrote:
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>> On Jun 20, 2014, at 11:34 AM, Anas via Marxism wrote:
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>> This vindicates the view that the US and Iran share many common interests in the Middle East.
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> As your posting equally vindicates the view that rrrevolutionaries like your good self share many "common interests" with the takfiris.
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> Shane Mage
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> "Thunderbolt steers all things." Herakleitos of Ephesos, fr. 64
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> 




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