[Marxism] Fw: book for review

George Snedeker george.snedeker at verizon.net
Tue Sep 30 09:23:08 MDT 2014


Socialism and Democracy is looking for someone to review the following book:
Omar Dahbour, SELF-DETERMINATION WITHOUT NATIONALISM, Temple University Press, 2014.

Write to me offline at george.snedeker at verizon.net if you would like to review this book. 



The following are several blurbs for this book from the publisher: 

 

 *"In *Self-Determination without Nationalism*, Omar Dahbour powerfully

combines trenchant criticisms of nationalism with the innovative

construction of an alternative ideal of collective self-determination as a

common project of ethical community. Richly informed and resourcefully

argued, his book illuminates central questions in the ethics of

international relations and political philosophy as a whole."*-Richard

Miller, Wyn and William Y. Hutchinson Professor in Ethics and Public Life

and Director, Program on Ethics and Public Life, Department of Philosophy,

Cornell University

 

 How do groups-be they religious or ethnic-achieve sovereignty in a

postnationalist world? In *Self-Determination without Nationalism: A Theory

of Postnational Sovereignty

<http://www.temple.edu/tempress/titles/2049_reg.html>*(Publication Date:

September 30, 2014), noted philosopher Omar Dahbour insists that the

existing ethics of international relations, dominated by the rival notions

of liberal nationalism and political cosmopolitanism, no longer suffice.

 

Dahbour notes that political communities are an ethically desirable and

historically inevitable feature of collective life. The ethical principles

that govern them, however-especially self-determination and

sovereignty-require reformulation in light of globalization and the

economic and environmental challenges of the twenty-first century.

 

Arguing that nation-states violate the principle of self-determination,

Dahbour then develops a detailed new theory of self-determination that he

calls "ecosovereignty." Ecosovereignty defines political community in a way

that can protect and further the rights of indigenous peoples as well as

the needs of ecological regions for a sustainable form of development and

security from environmental destruction.

 

In the series *Global Ethics and Politics

<http://www.temple.edu/tempress/gep.html>*, edited by Carol C. Gould

 

*Omar Dahbour* is Professor of Philosophy at Hunter College and Graduate

School, City University of New York, and is affiliated with CUNY's Center

for Place, Culture, and Politics. He is the author of *Illusion of the

Peoples: A Critique of National Self-Determination* and coeditor of both *The

Nationalism Reader* and *Democracy, States, and the Struggle for Global

Justice*.

 

George Snedeker

www.sdonline.org



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