[Marxism] Fwd: U.S. Arms Kurds Who Are ISIS Enemies, Turkey Enemies, Assad Friends

Nick Fredman nick.j.fredman at gmail.com
Fri May 12 22:26:38 MDT 2017


This is disturbing, if much of it is true - and the author's interpretation
of particular incidents and processes if they are happening are true. But
we don't know who this guy is, and to what extent his report is coloured by
political/sect affiliation or disgruntlement at probable loss of male and
Arab and sect privilege. One thing I'm particularly sceptical about is the
claim that religious-based dress is banned: I'm seen a number of reports
including recent Facebook posts from Kobane-based Hawzhin Azeez that
indicate a range of such dress being unremarkable throughout  liberated
Rojava. Azeez also related a recent trip to Manbiq where she met young
women who were very happy to dress *freely* and work for the first time.

Generally, There's plenty of reports very contradictory yo this one, and
lack of context to some things that might be true in this report. In my
article 'Fake news about the Rojava revolution'
http://links.org.au/fake-news-rojava-revolution various sources who can't
remotely be dismissed as apologists, like HRW, SOHR and an SNC-appointed
investigation team, who I cited regarding the "ethnic cleansing"
slander, didn't
mention anything like systematic ethnic or religious discrimination in
Rojava. None of the 150 people interviewed for the book Revolution in
Rojava
https://www.amazon.com/Revolution-Rojava-Democratic-Liberation-Kurdistan/dp/0745336590
mentioned anything but tolerance and cultural freedom for Arabs, Armenians
and Syriacs, and all brands of Christians and Muslims in Rojava.

Regarding the "friendliness" to Assad and the regime moving in etc.: it's
no secret there was a post-uprising agreement for the regime to continue to
pay teachers and some public servants salaries. But as I've argued here
before, in a fractured failed state it's not surprising for all sorts of
pragmatic and ad hoc agreements between factions not exactly in harmony to
continue or be set up. I've cited the observation in Jonathan Littell's
Syrian Notebooks that a pharmacy in the heart of FSA-held Homs in 2012
still received its regular deliveries from the Ministry of Health.

And the whole thing is quite a bit at odds with this recent report — by
someone we can identify — from the outskirts of Raqqa about the reception
Arabs are giving to SDF advances and the commune-democratisation of
liberated areas (maybe the view of women are to some extent different):

'Compounding the shock of their flight from Raqqa and sudden freedom, many
women said the first fighters they had seen across no man’s land had been
Kurdish women from the YPJ, the all-female units fighting as part of the
SDF.

'“One minute I lived in Raqqa, a city ruled by men,” said Um Lamis, “where
women had not even the power to show our faces. The next I am greeted by
armed Kurdish women, faces bare and their hair uncovered, guns in hands,
fighting the Daesh.

'“They welcomed me as a sister! I bow to their courage!”

'Contact with the YPJ cadres, each versed in the rights of women as a
central part of their own ideology, has left an indelible ­impression on
many Raqqa women.

'The emerging system of local governance is remarkable for its difference,
too. Typically, the Rojava territory is governed by local assemblies and
communes, all chaired by women.

'“At first some of the men in my village had a problem when I was elected
co-chairwoman to my local assembly,” said Amina al-Hassan, 30, a Sunni Arab
woman, who had lived for three years under Islamic State rule until her
village was liberated by the SDF.

“'They said it wasn’t my place as a woman,” she said. “So I said to them,
to their faces: ‘You didn’t dare say a word when the Daesh were in charge.
Now they have gone you want to deprive women again of their rights?’ The
men hung their heads.”

'Whatever the future of Raqqa’s women, and however male-dominated the
society to which they return after the defeat of Islamic State in Raqqa,
each woman I spoke to from the city said the ­experience of life there, and
their escape into a more egalitarian society, had irreversibly altered
their perceptions.'

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/world/the-times/niqabs-thrown-down-in-the-sand-as-women-flee-raqqa/news-story/04173c9a8acc056b27d02daf90e369bd


On Fri, May 12, 2017 at 10:24 PM, Louis Proyect via Marxism <
marxism at lists.csbs.utah.edu> wrote:

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