[Marxism] How Netflix And "Manning Marable" Killed Malcolm X (The Third Time) - CounterPunch.org

Dayne Goodwin daynegoodwin at gmail.com
Fri Feb 28 18:04:34 MST 2020


Important!  Thanks for setting the record straight, Richard.
Unbelievable misrepresentation from Andrew Stewart.  Shocking despite
already learning that it is a waste of my time to open messages from
Andrew Stewart and "Washington Babylon."
Dayne

On Fri, Feb 28, 2020 at 12:00 PM Richard Fidler via Marxism
<marxism at lists.csbs.utah.edu> wrote:
>> Andrew Stewart writes:
>> "[George] Breitman's Eurocentric Trotskyism articulates the claim that Black
>> nationalism is an ideological delusion that diverts from the revolutionary
>> cause. This is contrary to the Marxist-Leninist view, one embraced by Cuba and
>> China during the years El-Shabazz sought to build the bloc supporting the UN
>> petition, that the national liberation struggles are themselves revolutionary."
>
>
> This is an outrageous misrepresentation. Anyone who has read George Breitman or
> who knew him personally (as I did) would consider the view attributed to him by
> Stewart to be beyond reason or belief. Breitman was one of the most far-sighted
> Marxist sympathizers of Black nationalism in the United States. He probably did
> more than anyone else to publicize Malcolm's revolutionary legacy (the real
> legacy ignored by the Netflix series)...
> . . .
> Unfortunately, the book cited by Stewart (The Last Year of Malcolm X: The
> Evolution of a Revolutionary) is not on-line, although it can be purchased from
> several sources. But anyone with a copy can see countless statements in it that
> refute Stewart's libellous allegation. In particular, I recommend what Breitman
> writes on pp. 55-56 and 66-69. As he states in the final paragraph of those
> pages:
>
> "[Malcolm's] uncertainty about the name to call himself arose from the fact that
> he was doing something new in the United States -- he was on the way to a
> synthesis of black nationalism and socialism that would be fitting for the
> American scene and acceptable to the masses in the black ghetto. (An example of
> the tendency of revolutionary nationalism to grow over into and become merged
> with socialism can be seen in Cuba, where Castro and his movement began as
> nationalist.) Malcolm did not complete this synthesis before he was
> assassinated. It remains for others to complete what he began."
>
> -- Richard


On Fri, Feb 28, 2020 at 12:00 PM Richard Fidler via Marxism
<marxism at lists.csbs.utah.edu> wrote:
>
> Andrew Stewart writes:
>
> "[George] Breitman's Eurocentric Trotskyism articulates the claim that Black
> nationalism is an ideological delusion that diverts from the revolutionary
> cause. This is contrary to the Marxist-Leninist view, one embraced by Cuba and
> China during the years El-Shabazz sought to build the bloc supporting the UN
> petition, that the national liberation struggles are themselves revolutionary."
>
> This is an outrageous misrepresentation. Anyone who has read George Breitman or
> who knew him personally (as I did) would consider the view attributed to him by
> Stewart to be beyond reason or belief. Breitman was one of the most far-sighted
> Marxist sympathizers of Black nationalism in the United States. He probably did
> more than anyone else to publicize Malcolm's revolutionary legacy (the real
> legacy ignored by the Netflix series). Consider just this one brief excerpt from
> his extensive writings spanning several decades. It is from "In Defense of Black
> Power," (October 1966), available with many other works in the Breitman Archive
> on Marxists.org.:
>
> "Organizationally, the Black Power tendency is only in the early stages of its
> development; the various groups and individuals who have raised the Black Power
> banner have not yet defined their relations to each other or united into a
> single movement or federation. But numerically it is already considerably
> stronger than the organized adherents of Malcolm's movement. The Student
> Non-violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and the Congress of Racial Equality
> (CORE), groups in the new tendency, are national organizations, with thousands
> of members or sympathizers. They have an experienced cadre of dedicated leaders
> and activists, hardened in battle along many fronts and equipped with a variety
> of skills. They represent the best of the new generation of young freedom
> fighters who appeared on the scene around 1960, with a consistently more
> militant outlook than that of previous generations and an enviable ability to
> learn from experience and grow.
>
> "Ideologically and politically, the Black Power tendency is also still in the
> process of crystallization. But its direction-to the left-is unmistakably
> indicated by the way it has broken away from several of the premises and
> shibboleths of the old "civil rights" consensus. Internationalist and
> anti-imperialist, it expresses solidarity with the worldwide struggle against
> colonialism and neo-colonialism, condemns the US war in Vietnam and rejects the
> contention that the freedom movement "should not mix civil rights and foreign
> policy." It spurns the straitjacket of "non-violence" and proclaims the right of
> self-defense. It challenges the fraudulent claim that freedom can be won through
> the passage of a series of civil-rights laws that are largely un-enforced and
> benefit mainly middle-class Negroes.
>
> "Some of its adherents still believe in working inside the Democratic Party, but
> others advocate a complete break with the Democrats and Republicans and the
> establishment of independent black or black-led parties - not only in Lowndes
> County, Ala., but in the Northern ghettos. Some accept capitalism; others are
> talking rather vaguely about a cooperative based economy for the black community
> that they think would be neither capitalist nor socialist; and there is also
> evidently a pro-socialist grouping, as was shown when delegates at a Black Power
> planning conference in Washington Sept. 3 posed the need to "determine which is
> more politically feasible for the advancement of black power, capitalism or
> socialism."
>
> Unfortunately, the book cited by Stewart (The Last Year of Malcolm X: The
> Evolution of a Revolutionary) is not on-line, although it can be purchased from
> several sources. But anyone with a copy can see countless statements in it that
> refute Stewart's libellous allegation. In particular, I recommend what Breitman
> writes on pp. 55-56 and 66-69. As he states in the final paragraph of those
> pages:
>
> "[Malcolm's] uncertainty about the name to call himself arose from the fact that
> he was doing something new in the United States -- he was on the way to a
> synthesis of black nationalism and socialism that would be fitting for the
> American scene and acceptable to the masses in the black ghetto. (An example of
> the tendency of revolutionary nationalism to grow over into and become merged
> with socialism can be seen in Cuba, where Castro and his movement began as
> nationalist.) Malcolm did not complete this synthesis before he was
> assassinated. It remains for others to complete what he began."
>
> -- Richard
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Marxism [mailto:marxism-bounces at lists.csbs.utah.edu] On Behalf Of Andrew
> Stewart via Marxism
> Sent: Friday, February 28, 2020 6:50 AM
> Subject: [Marxism] How Netflix And "Manning Marable" Killed Malcolm X (The Third
> Time) - CounterPunch.org
>
> https://www.counterpunch.org/2020/02/28/how-netflix-and-manning-marable-killed-m
> alcolm-x-the-third-time/



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